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Here's an  in-line greyscale image with default settings and unpredicable placement on the page. 

<IMG SRC="ugly2.gif">

If you resize the  browser window the image jumps around as the lines re-wrap.  Here's an in-line greyscale image with default settings and unpredictable placement on the page.  If you resize the browser window the image jumps around as the lines re-wrap.  even fewer web browsers are sophisticated enough to tell thedifference when both faces do exist.

Figure 5-26

Figure 5-26. More font styles

If either of these is the case, a few things can happen. If there isno Italic face, but there is an Oblique face, then the latter can beused for the former. If the situation is reversed -- an Italicface exists, but there is no defined Oblique face -- the useragent may not substitute the former for the latter, according to theCSS specification. Finally, the user agent can simply generate the

Example

:linkIE4 Y/Y IE5 Y/Y NN4 Y/Y Op3 Y/-

This pseudo-class applies to hyperlinks, but not named anchors. It sets the styles to be used for a hyperlink that points to a URI that has not yet been visited (i.e., is not listed in the browser's history).

Example

>This pseudo-class applies to hyperlinks, but not named anchors. It sets the styles to be used for a hyperlink that points to a URI that has already been visited (i.e., background-position. The other is that negative percentages are somewhat interesting to calculate. Figure 6-47 shows why.

Figure 6-47

Figure 6-47. Aligning negative percentage points: two scenarios

This isn't to say that you shouldn't use negative values, of course, just that there are issues to consider. As always.

WARNING

Although most CSS-aware browsers (Explorer 4.x and 5.x bottom for any positioned element within that containing block are treated as auto.

In addition, even though they don't explicitly say so, the examples in this section (and the next few sections) are all based around absolute positioning. Since absolute positioning is the simplest scheme in which to demonstrate how top, right, bottom, and left work, we'll stick to that for now.