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Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book

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Index: Z

z-axis: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements
z-index property: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements


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Figure 7-11

Figure 7-11. Percentage margins and changing environments

As you can imagine, this leads to the possibility of "fluid" pages, where the margins and padding of elements enlarge or reduce to match the actual size of the display canvas. In theory, as the user changes the width of a browser window, the margins and padding will expand or shrink dynamically -- but not every browser supports this sort of behavior. Still, using percentages for margin and padding may be the best way to set styles that | Y | Z


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Figure 10-3

Figure 10-3. Making BODY's grandchildren (and their descendants) gray

On the other hand, perhaps you wish to make purple any element thatis a descendant of DIV. This would be written:

DIV * {color: purple;}

At first glance, this seems no different than if the* were left out, instead relying on inheritance tocarry the color to all descendants ofDIV. However, there is a very real difference: therule shown would match every DIV descendant, and