Sunday 26th of June 2016 11:56:46 AM

Book Home

Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book

Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Index: Y

There are no index entries for this letter.


WARNING

Percentage values refer to the width of the parent element.

As you can see, this property accepts any length value or a percentage. That's all. So if you want all H1 elements to have 10 pixels of padding on all sides, it's this easy, as the result shown in Figure 7-56 makes clear:

Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z


Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Figure 7-34

Figure 7-34. Equivalent style rules

In case you're wondering, under CSS1, there is no way todirectly set the style for only a single side using something likeborder-top-style, since no such property exists inCSS1 (although that property, and others like it, were introduced inCSS2). You can, however, sneak around this limitation by declaringthe style for a given border using one of the shorthand propertieswe'll discuss later in the chapter.

7.4.1.2. Falling back on solid

There is one interesting thing about CSS that can make life difficult for authors. According to CSS1, a user agent is allowed to interpret any value of border-style (besides none) as solid. Because of this allowance, a user agent that is technically CSS1-compliant could display the following as all solid:

P.new3 {border-style: ridge dashed double;}
contains an inline boldface element, and the second an absolutelypositioned boldface element. In the second paragraph, the styles usedwould be something like what is shown here:

P {position: relative;}   /* establish containing blocks */<B STYLE="position: absolute; top: auto; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: auto;width: 8em; height: 4em;">...</B>
Figure 9-19

Figure 9-19. The effects of absolute positioning

For the most part, the text in both paragraphs looks fairly normal.In the second one, however, the place where the boldface element

This appendix lists all CSS1 properties, plus the CSS1pseudo-elements and pseudo-classes. The values to the right of aproperty name show the browser compatibility information for thatproperty. They will look something like this:

The first value in each pair is for the Windows version; the secondvalue is for the Macintosh version. (Sorry, Macintosh folks, but weare in the minority.) For instance, IE4 Y/N means that the propertyis supported in IE4 for Windows, but not IE4 for Macintosh. Thepossible support values are:

XML is an open standard

By making the W3C the keeper of the XML standard, it ensures that no one vendor should be able to cause interoperability problems to occur between systems that use the open standard. This should be reassuring to most companies making an investment in this technology, by being vendor neutral, this solution proposes to keep even small companies out of reach of big companies choosing to change the standards on them. For example, if a big company chooses to change the platform at its whim, then most other companies relying on that platform suffer. By keeping all data in XML and using XML in communications protocols, companies can maximize the lifetime of their investment in their products and solutions.

XML is language independent

By being language independent, XML bypasses the requirement to have a standard binary encoding or storage format. Language independence also fosters immense interoperability amongst heterogeneous systems. It is also good for future compatilbilty. For example, if in the future a product needs to be changed in order to deal with a new computing paradigm or network protocol, by keeping XML flowing through the system, addition of a new layer to deal with this change is feasible.