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padding-top, padding-right, padding-bottom, padding-left

Values

<length> | <percentage>

Initial value
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Opera 3.6.

8.2.2.3. More than one auto

Now let us consider the cases where two of these three properties areset to auto. If both the margins are set toauto, then they are set to equal lengths, thuscentering the element within its parent, as you can see from Figure 8-14:

As we can see in Figure 6-34, the very small image triplebor.gif is repeated vertically along the left side of the heading element, resulting in an effect that isn't otherwise possible.

Figure 6-34

Figure 6-34. Creating a "triple border" on H2 elements

We can take that further and decide to set a wavy border along the top of each H1 element, as illustrated in Figure 6-35. The image is colored in such a way that it blends with the background color and produces the wavy effect shown:

any positive margins.

In the case where there are only two margins to be collapsed, one positive and the other negative, the situation is handled in a fairly simple manner. The absolute value of the negative margin is subtracted from the positive margin -- or, to put it another way, the negative is added to the positive -- and the resulting value is the distance between the elements.

To see what this means, let's start with a paragraph that has awould have the result shown in Figure 8-53.

Figure 8-53

Figure 8-53. Changing the vertical alignment of the larger text

Here, the middle of the boldfaced text's inline box has lined up with the middle of the inline boxes of the other text in the line. Because the inline boxes are all 12px tall, and their middles are all lined up, this means that the line box for this line is now only 12 pixels high, just like the others. However, it also means that the oversized text intrudes into other lines even more than before.

Subject to the restrictions introduced by the previous seven rules, of course. Historically, browsers aligned the top of a floated element with the top of the line box after the one in which the image's tag appears. Rule 8, however, implies that its top should be even with the top of the same line box as that in which its tag appears, assuming there is room to do so. The theoretically correct behaviors are shown in Figure 8-37.

Figure 8-37

Figure 8-37. Given the other constraints, go as high as possible