Wednesday 01st of October 2014 06:14:34 PM

Book Home

Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book

Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Index: Y

There are no index entries for this letter.


Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V

Figure 9-21

Figure 9-21. Setting a "change bar" with absolute positioning

However, maybe we'd like to place the change marker next to whatever line was changed. In that case, we need to make only one small alteration to our styles, and we'll get the result shown in Figure 9-22:

SPAN.change {position: absolute; top: static-position; left: -5em; width: 4em;
font-weight: bold;}
P {margin-left: 5em; position: relative;}
<P> Lorem ipsum, dolor sit amet, consectetuer adipiscing elit,
| W
| X
| Y
| Z



Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

Client and Server side - Application Servers

The 2nd category of Java applications called Java Application Servers (or app servers) and they make good use of XML. Unlike client side graphical Java apps (from the previous section) which are very standalone in their operations, app servers tie many different networked software components together in order to provide information from multiple sources to a set of client side Java apps or web browsers (maybe even running on different devices). This is shown in Figure 2. An app server is actually a conglomeration of several distributed and client/server software systems. So when you write an app server, you are actually writing many different software systems which are all networked to work together, to process information that comes from various sources, and distribute this information to a set of client apps (that you also have to write) running on different devices and platforms.

How can XML help app servers do their work? As you can see in Figure 2, in order for the app server to harvest information from such a rich variety of sources, there must be some common ground between all of these sources (each of which might be running on a different hardware and software system). This common ground is the information which flows throughout the entire system, regardless of what source the information comes from. CORBA is an example of tying disparate systems together based on the interfaces that certain remote objects implement. XML does the same thing for data. It allows these disparate systems to share information in a medium that consists only of pure information (and the structural relationships that exist inside of that information). By taking the lowest common denominator approach by using plain text to encode data, XML allows these systems to talk with each other without requiring any special binary information format converters or other service layers to translate between binary formats (for encoding data). Also, since HTTP already supports transmission of plain text, it is completely natural to move XML around using the Hyper Text Transfer Protocol through firewalls and disparate networks. This is shown in Figure 3. XML can be transmitted between systems using one of the most prevalent protocols in use today, Hypertext Transfer Protocol or HTTP 1.1 (which is the protocol of the web).

P {position: relative;}   /* establish containing blocks */
<B STYLE="position: absolute; top: auto; right: 0; bottom: 0; left: auto;
width: 8em; height: 4em;">...</B>
Figure 9-19

Figure 9-19. The effects of absolute positioning

For the most part, the text in both paragraphs looks fairly normal. In the second one, however, the place where the boldface element would have appeared is simply closed up, and the positioned text overlaps the some of the content. There is no way to avoid this, short of positioning the boldfaced text outside of the paragraph (by using a negative value for right) or by specifying