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Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book

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Index: X

x-height: 3.2.2.1. em and ex units
XML (Extensible Markup Language): 1.2.6. Preparing for the Future
display property and: 2.9.1. Why Does the display Property Exist?
selectors in: 2.1.2. Simple Selectors


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H4 {border-style: dashed solid double;}H4 {border: medium green;}

This will result in H4 elements having no borderat all, because the lack of a border-style in the second rule meansthat the default value of none will be used. Aswe've seen, that will turn the border off altogether.

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In the future, with publicly available DTDs that are standardized for each vertical industry, XML based app servers will become very popular. Also when XML schema repositories become available and widely used, app servers will be able to take on a new role and provide application services that are not offered now. Companies will need to share information with other companies in related fields, and each company might have a different software system in which all their data is housed. By agreeing upon a set of DTDs or schemas (encoded in XML), these companies can exchange information with each other regardless of what systems they are using to store this information. If their app servers can exchange XML documents (based on some shared DTD or schema), then these disparate app servers can understand each other and share information. One of the uses for XML foreseen by the W3C is just this, vertical industries (like insurance and health care) creating sets of DTDs and schemas that all companies in the industry agree upon. Then these companies' app servers can talk to each other using some popular protocol (like HTTP or CORBA/IIOP) to exchange information between each other. This has the potential to save a lot of time and money in the daily business operations of these companies.

Web-based Applications

Web-based applications are similar to app servers, except for one thing: Web-based applications don't have client apps, instead they use web browsers on the client side. They generate their front ends using HTML, which is dynamically generated by the web-based app. In the Java world, Servlets are best suited for this job.

what they don't say. The first thing to discuss is what happens when the floated element is taller than its parent element.

This happens quite often, as a matter of fact, and was discussed in the previous chapter. Take the example of a short document, composed of no more than a few paragraphs and H3 elements, where the first paragraph contains a floated image. Further, this floated image has a right margin of 5 pixels (5px ). You would expect the document to be rendered very much as shown in"name" references a font name (Arial, Times New Roman or whatever); and "color" is an RGB hexadecimal triple or one of the 16 named colors. 

Then you can change font attributes for special pieces of text in-line with FONT tags: 
<FONT SIZE="n" FACE="name" COLOR="color"> ... </FONT>

Be careful about specifying fonts in the <BASEFONT> or <FONT> tag.  You can count on all browsers having the basic fonts--Arial, Courier and Times Roman--but browsers that don't have the font you specify

Applies to

all elements

WARNING

Percentage values refer to the width of the parent element.

the elements following the DIV are placed according to the location of the bottom of the DIV. As we can see, the end of the DIV is actually above the visual bottom of its child paragraph. The next element after the DIV is the appropriate distance from the bottom of the DIV. The fact that it overlaps the paragraph doesn't matter, at least not technically.

Now let's consider an example where the margins of a list item,