Thursday 19th of January 2017 01:51:35 PM

Book Home

Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book

Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M larger than the surrounding text. </P>

Since we've given the "tall" text a line-height of 18px , the difference between font-size and line-height is 6 pixels. In this case, though, the half-leading of 3 pixels is added to the content area, not subtracted (since the line-height is more than the font-size). This will result in an inline box 18 pixels tall, and its top is aligned with the top of the line box. | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Index: X

x-height: 3.2.2.1. em and ex units
XML (Extensible Markup Language): 1.2.6. Preparing for the Future
display property and: 2.9.1. Why Does the display Property Exist?
selectors in: 2.1.2. Simple Selectors


Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z


Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

border-color: gray;}H1 {border-width: 0 0 thick; /* option #2 */border-style: none none solid;border-color: gray;}

Neither is really convenient, given all the typing involved.Fortunately, a better solution is available:

H1 {border-bottom: thick solid gray;}

This will apply the values to the bottom border alone, as shown inFigure 7-45, leaving the others to their defaults.

7.4.1.2. Falling back on solid

There is one interesting thing about CSS that can make life difficult for authors. According to CSS1, a user agent is allowed to interpret any value of border-style (besides none) as solid. Because of this allowance, a user agent that is technically CSS1-compliant could display the following as all solid:

P.new3 {border-style: ridge dashed double;}

The result shown in Figure 7-35 wouldn't be