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Index: U

U element: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
UA (see user agent)
underlining: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
changing color of: 4.1.6.1. Weird decorations
removing from hyperlinks: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
turned off by browsers: 4.1.6.1. Weird decorations
Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): 3.5. CSS2 Units
Uniform Resource Locators (see URLs)
units: 11.1.3. Case 3: Putting a Magazine Article Online
(see also length units; CSS2 units)
for aural style sheets: 3.5. CSS2 Units
avoiding mixing: 11.1.3. Case 3: Putting a Magazine Article Online
color: 3.6. Summary
universal selector: 10.2.1.1. Universal selector
unordered lists: 7.7.1. Types of Lists
unvisited anchors: 2.4.1. Pseudo-Class Selectors
uppercase text: 4.1.5. Text Transformation
upright text: 5.4.1. Fonts with Style
URI (Uniform Resource Identifier): 3.5. CSS2 Units
URLs (Uniform Resource Locators): 3.4. URLs
HREF attribute and: 1.4.1.1. LINK attributes
referring to in style sheets: 3.4. URLs
idea behind positioning is fairly simple. It allows you to defineexactly where element boxes will appear relative to where they wouldordinarily be -- or relative to a parent element, or anotherelement, or even to the browser window itself. The power of thisfeature is both obvious and surprising. It shouldn't be toosurprising to learn that this is the part of CSS2 that user agentsusually first attempt to support. Given that there were some verygood positioning implementations on the horizon as the book was beingcompleted, we felt it worthwhile to give readers a glimpse ofwhat's coming soon -- or, if you're reading this book
specifying for images: 6.2.1. Background Images
user agent (UA): 2.2.2. Grouping Declarations
2.2.2. Grouping Declarations
(see also browsers)
users, selecting alternate style sheets: 1.4.1.2. Alternate style sheets


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BODY {background-image: url(yinyang.gif);background-repeat: repeat;}
Figure 6-28

Figure 6-28. Tiling the background image in CSS

I've left out a background color in order to keep the ruleshort, but remember to include a background color any time you have abackground image. And, of course, the effect shown in Figure 6-28 would have been the same if we'd leftout the background-repeat property altogether,since repeat is its default value.

uppercase; had been used instead, as shown in Figure 5-30. This is obviously not an ideal solution, but it is permitted.

H1 {font-variant: small-caps;}
Figure 5-30

Figure 5-30. Legal, if not optimal, rendering of small caps

WARNING

Of the browsers which even recognize font-variant: small-caps (Explorer 4 and 5, and Opera 3.5), only Opera and IE5 for Macintosh do what authors would expect in the

TIP

The fictional LINE element actually clarifies the behavior that results from setting line-height on a block-level element. According to the CSS specification, declaring line-height on a block-level element sets a minimum line-box height for the content of that block-level element. Thus, declaring P.spacious {line-height: 24pt;} means that the minimum height for each line box is 24 points. Technically, the