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Index: U

U element: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
UA (see user agent)

All of the advantages of XML outlined so far all make interoperability possible. This is one of the most important requirements for XML, to enable disparate systems to be able to share information easily.

By taking the lowest common denominator approach, by being web enabled, protocol independent, network independent, platform independent and extensible, XML makes it possible for new systems and old systems (that are all different) to communicate with each other. Encoding information in plain text with tags is better than using propietary and platform dependent binary formats.

Vision

XML provides solutions for problems that have existed for the past 20 years. With most applications and software services using the Internet as a target platform for deployment, XML could not have come at a better time. With the web becoming so popular, a new paradigm of computing has emerged for which XML supplies one of the most important pieces, platform, vendor and application neutral data. Regardless of the programming language used to process XML, it will enable this new networked computing world.

underlining: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
changing color of: 4.1.6.1. Weird decorations
removing from hyperlinks: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
turned off by browsers: 4.1.6.1. Weird decorations
Uniform Resource Identifier (URI): 3.5. CSS2 Units
Uniform Resource Locators (see URLs)
units: 11.1.3. Case 3: Putting a Magazine Article Online
(see also length units; CSS2 units)
for aural style sheets: 3.5. CSS2 Units
avoiding mixing: 11.1.3. Case 3: Putting a Magazine Article Online
color: 3.6. Summary
universal selector: 10.2.1.1. Universal selector
unordered lists: 7.7.1. Types of Lists
unvisited anchors: 2.4.1. Pseudo-Class Selectors
uppercase text: 4.1.5. Text Transformation
upright text: 5.4.1. Fonts with Style
URI (Uniform Resource Identifier): 3.5. CSS2 Units
URLs (Uniform Resource Locators): 3.4. URLs
HREF attribute and: 1.4.1.1. LINK attributes
referring to in style sheets: 3.4. URLs
specifying for images: 6.2.1. Background Images
user agent (UA): 2.2.2. Grouping Declarations
2.2.2. Grouping Declarations
(see also browsers)
users, selecting alternate style sheets: 1.4.1.2. Alternate style sheets


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interesting is that these two things actually do influence the height of the line box. Consider Figure 8-66.

Figure 8-66

Figure 8-66. Adding padding and borders to an inline replaced element

Note that the "first" line box is tall enough to contain the image, whereas the "second" is tall enough to contain the image, its padding, and its border. This is because the totality of the replaced element (content, padding, borders) make up the inline box for the replaced element. This is what forces the line boxes to be taller in Figure 8-66.

  • You can use the DOM parser to generate the XML for you if you created an object model that is an adapter on top of DOM. Since your object model uses the document object tree, all the information contained in it is actually stored in the tree. The XML parser can take this tree and convert it to XML for you, you can then save this generated XML to a file. So the DOM parser can generate the ApplicationML file for you.
  • There are advantages and disadvantages to using some of the strategies to import and export XML. The complexity of your application data and available system resources are factors that would determine what strategy should be used.

    Client and Server side - Application Servers

    of the letters. Starting with the easy stuff, here's what we have for the title H1:

    H1 {font: 300% Helvetica,sans-serif; font-variant: small-caps;
    letter-spacing: 0.75em;}

    As was already observed, the title is right-justified but isn't up against the right margin. The easiest thing to do is insert some padding to the H1's right side, which leads us to the following declarations:

    {color: maroon;}, you probably expect that any text within that paragraph will also be maroon, even if it's emphasized or boldfaced or whatever. Of course, if you want such elements to be different colors, that's easy enough, as illustrated by Figure 6-9:

    P {color: maroon;}
    EM {color: #999999;}
    Figure 6-9

    Figure 6-9. Different colors for different elements

    Thanks to the inheritability of color, it's theoretically possible to