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Index: S

S element: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
sample projects using CSS: 11. CSS in Action
sans serif fonts: 5.1. Font Families
Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG): 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
scaling factor
absolute font sizes: 5.3.1. Absolute Sizes
line height and: 4.1.2. The Height of Lines
scaling line heights: 8.4.3.1. Scaling the line heights
scrollbars: 9.1.4.1. Overflow
block-level elements and: 8.2.1.1. Height
selectors: 2.1.1. Rule Structure
class: 2.3. Class and ID Selectors
2.3.1. Class Selectors
CSS2: 10.2. CSS2 Selectors
grouping: 2.2.1. Grouping Selectors
ID: 2.3. Class and ID Selectors
2.3.2. ID Selectors
pseudo-class: 2.4.1. Pseudo-Class Selectors
an element from exceeding a certain size, as in this:

max-height: 30em; max-width: 20em;

The question here, though, is what happens if the content of the element doesn't all fit into the specified element size. Does it get cut off at the boundaries, or does it spill outside the positioned element? That's what the next section will explore.

pseudo-element: 2.4.2. Pseudo-Element Selectors
semicolon (;) terminating declarations: 2.1.3. Declarations
2.2.2. Grouping Declarations
serif fonts: 5.1. Font Families
servers, external style sheets and: 11.2.11. Serving CSS Up Correctly
seven properties of horizontal formatting[seven properties of horizontal formatting: 8.2.2.1. Horizontal properties
shadow, adding to text: 10.3.2. text-shadow
shorthand hex notation: 3.1.2.4. Short hexadecimal colors
shorthand properties: 7.4.4. Shorthand Border Properties
background property: 6.2.6. Bringing It All Together
border property: 7.4.4. Shorthand Border Properties
font property: 5.5. Using Shorthand: The font Property
list-style property: 7.7.4. List Styles In Shorthand
shrink-wrapping content: 9.1.3.1. Setting width and height
shrinking text: 11.2.6. The Incredible Shrinking Text!
side-offset properties: 9.1.2. Side Offsets
sidebar: 11.1.2. Case 2: Library Catalog System Interface
images in: 6.2.2. Repeats with Direction
simulating class/ID selectors: 10.2.2.4. Simulating class and ID
single attribute values, matching: 10.2.2.3. Matching single attribute values
single quotation marks ( ): 5.1.3. Using Quotation Marks
single-side margin properties: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
slanted text: 5.4.1. Fonts with Style
small-caps text: 5.4.2. Font Variations
sorting (cascade rules): 2.8. The Cascade
spaces separating keywords: 2.1.3. Declarations
2.1.3. Declarations
spacing: 4.1.4. Word Spacing and Letterspacing
alignment and: 4.1.4.3. Spacing, alignment, and font size
letter: 4.1.4.2. Letterspacing
speak properties: 10.7. Tables
special effects
background colors: 6.1.3. Special Effects
perfect alignment of backgrounds: 6.2.5.1. Interesting effects
text shadow: 10.3.2. text-shadow
specificity: 2.7. Specificity
inheritance and: 2.7.1. Inheritance and Specificity
specificity sorting: 2.8. The Cascade
speech-synthesis browsers: 1.1.1. What a Mess
1.1.1. What a Mess
10.8.2. The Spoken Word
stacking context: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements
stacking positioned elements: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements
sticky notes: 9.3. Absolute Positioning
stress property: 10.8.2. The Spoken Word
STRIKE element: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
strikethrough (see line-through)
structural languages: 1.2.6. Preparing for the Future
structural markup: 1.1.1. What a Mess
structure of rules: 2.1.1. Rule Structure
STYLE attribute: 1.4.6. Inline Styles
2.8. The Cascade
quotation marks and: 5.1.3. Using Quotation Marks
specificity and: 2.7.1. Inheritance and Specificity
style declarations: 1.4.4. Actual Styles
STYLE element: 1.4.2. The STYLE Element
style sheets
alternate, defining: 1.4.1.1. LINK attributes
cascading (see CSS)
consistency, achieving with: 11.1.1. Case 1: Consistent Look and Feel
document: 1.4.2. The STYLE Element
embedded: 1.4.2. The STYLE Element
external (see external style sheets)
ignored when not recognized: 1.4.4. Actual Styles
imported: 1.2.3. Using Your Styles on Multiple Pages
overriding styles in: 7.6.1.3. No floating at all
linking to HTML documents: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
making concise through grouping: 2.2. Grouping
naming: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
reader: 1.2.4. Cascading
styles: 1.4.4. Actual Styles
for borders: 7.4.1. Borders with Style
disappearing with Netscape Navigator: 11.2.10. Disappearing Styles
inline: 1.4.6. Inline Styles
using on multiple pages: 1.2.3. Using Your Styles on Multiple Pages
styling common elements: 11.2.4. Styling Common Elements
stylistic languages: 1.2.6. Preparing for the Future
subscript (SUB) element: 4.1.3. Vertical Alignment
subscripting: 4.1.3.2. Superscripting and subscripting
superscript (SUP) element: 4.1.3. Vertical Alignment
superscripting: 4.1.3.2. Superscripting and subscripting
SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics): 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope


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Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible

By not predefining any tags in the XML Recommendation, the W3C allowed developers full control over customizing their data as they see fit. This makes XML very attractive to encoding data that already exists in legacy databases (by using database metadata, and other schema information). This extensibility of XML makes it such a great fit when trying to get different systems to work with each other.

XML supports shareable structure (using DTDs)

but percentages and lengths can be mixed together.

Not only that, but if you're using lengths or percentages, you can give negative values, thus pushing the image out of the element, to some degree. Consider the example with the very large yin-yang symbol for a background. At one point, we centered it, but what if we only want part of it visible in the top left corner of the containing element? No problem, at least in theory. First, assume the image is 300 pixels tall by 300 pixels wide. Then, assume that only the bottom right third of it should be visible. We can get the desired effect0 (zero), effectively removing any top or bottom margin from the element box, as shown in Figure 8-5. The lack of any space between the borders of each paragraph is a result of auto being reinterpreted as zero:

P {margin-top: auto; margin-bottom: auto;}
Figure 8-5

Figure 8-5. Automatically setting margins to zero

8.2.1.2. Collapsing vertical margins

the bottom and right margins to be 20 pixels. In that case, you have to write the following:

H1 {margin: 10px 20px 20px 10px;} /* can't be any shorter */

Unfortunately, there is no way to cut down on the number of values needed in such a circumstance.

Let's take another example: one where we want all of the margins to be auto -- except for the left margin, which should be 3em :red, and some white, for example.

Now, thanks to the power of CSS, you can have many, many differentcolors within a single page, and without using a singleFONT tag. This gives authors the ability to set uppages where the main text is black with a white background, but thenavigational hyperlinks along the side of the page are black on alight purple background. There are almost infinite possibilities:defining red text for warnings, using a dark purple to make boldfacedtext even more obvious, setting each heading to be a different shade