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Index: S

S element: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
sample projects using CSS: 11. CSS in Action
sans serif fonts: 5.1. Font Families
Scalable Vector Graphics (SVG): 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
scaling factor
absolute font sizes: 5.3.1. Absolute Sizes
line height and: 4.1.2. The Height of Lines
scaling line heights: 8.4.3.1. Scaling the line heights
scrollbars: 9.1.4.1. Overflow
block-level elements and: 8.2.1.1. Height
selectors: 2.1.1. Rule Structure
class: 2.3. Class and ID Selectors
2.3.1. Class Selectors
CSS2: 10.2. CSS2 Selectors
grouping: 2.2.1. Grouping Selectors
ID: 2.3. Class and ID Selectors
2.3.2. ID Selectors
pseudo-class: 2.4.1. Pseudo-Class Selectors
pseudo-element: 2.4.2. Pseudo-Element Selectors
semicolon (;) terminating declarations: 2.1.3. Declarations
2.2.2. Grouping Declarations
serif fonts: 5.1. Font Families
servers, external style sheets and: 11.2.11. Serving CSS Up Correctly
seven properties of horizontal formatting[seven properties of horizontal formatting: 8.2.2.1. Horizontal properties
shadow, adding to text: 10.3.2. text-shadow
shorthand hex notation: 3.1.2.4. Short hexadecimal colors
shorthand properties: 7.4.4. Shorthand Border Properties
background property: 6.2.6. Bringing It All Together
border property: 7.4.4. Shorthand Border Properties
font property: 5.5. Using Shorthand: The font Property
list-style property: 7.7.4. List Styles In Shorthand
shrink-wrapping content: 9.1.3.1. Setting width and height
shrinking text: 11.2.6. The Incredible Shrinking Text!

By being language independent, XML bypasses the requirement to have a standard binary encoding or storage format. Language independence also fosters immense interoperability amongst heterogeneous systems. It is also good for future compatilbilty. For example, if in the future a product needs to be changed in order to deal with a new computing paradigm or network protocol, by keeping XML flowing through the system, addition of a new layer to deal with this change is feasible.

DOM and SAX are open, language-independent set of interfaces

By defining a set of programming language independent interfaces that allow the accessing and mutation of XML documents, the W3C made it easier for programmers to deal with XML. Not only does XML address the need for a standard information encoding and storage format, it also allows programmers a standard way to use that information. SAX is a very low level API, but it is more than what has been available before it. DOM is a higher level API that even provides a default object model for all XML documents (saving time in creating one from scratch if you are using data is document data).

SAX, DOM and XML are very developer friendly because developers are going to decide whether this technology will be adopted by the majority and become a successful effort towards the goal of interoperable, platform, and device independent computing.

side-offset properties: 9.1.2. Side Offsets
sidebar: 11.1.2. Case 2: Library Catalog System Interface
images in: 6.2.2. Repeats with Direction
simulating class/ID selectors: 10.2.2.4. Simulating class and ID
single attribute values, matching: 10.2.2.3. Matching single attribute values
single quotation marks ( ): 5.1.3. Using Quotation Marks
single-side margin properties: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
slanted text: 5.4.1. Fonts with Style
small-caps text: 5.4.2. Font Variations
sorting (cascade rules): 2.8. The Cascade
spaces separating keywords: 2.1.3. Declarations
2.1.3. Declarations
spacing: 4.1.4. Word Spacing and Letterspacing
alignment and: 4.1.4.3. Spacing, alignment, and font size
letter: 4.1.4.2. Letterspacing
speak properties: 10.7. Tables
special effects
background colors: 6.1.3. Special Effects
perfect alignment of backgrounds: 6.2.5.1. Interesting effects
text shadow: 10.3.2. text-shadow
specificity: 2.7. Specificity
inheritance and: 2.7.1. Inheritance and Specificity
specificity sorting: 2.8. The Cascade
speech-synthesis browsers: 1.1.1. What a Mess
1.1.1. What a Mess
10.8.2. The Spoken Word
stacking context: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements
stacking positioned elements: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements
sticky notes: 9.3. Absolute Positioning
stress property: 10.8.2. The Spoken Word
STRIKE element: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
strikethrough (see line-through)
structural languages: 1.2.6. Preparing for the Future
structural markup: 1.1.1. What a Mess
structure of rules: 2.1.1. Rule Structure
STYLE attribute: 1.4.6. Inline Styles
2.8. The Cascade
quotation marks and: 5.1.3. Using Quotation Marks
specificity and: 2.7.1. Inheritance and Specificity
style declarations: 1.4.4. Actual Styles
STYLE element: 1.4.2. The STYLE Element
style sheets
alternate, defining: 1.4.1.1. LINK attributes
cascading (see CSS)
consistency, achieving with: 11.1.1. Case 1: Consistent Look and Feel
document: 1.4.2. The STYLE Element
embedded: 1.4.2. The STYLE Element
external (see external style sheets)
ignored when not recognized: 1.4.4. Actual Styles
imported: 1.2.3. Using Your Styles on Multiple Pages
overriding styles in: 7.6.1.3. No floating at all
linking to HTML documents: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
making concise through grouping: 2.2. Grouping
naming: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
reader: 1.2.4. Cascading
styles: 1.4.4. Actual Styles
for borders: 7.4.1. Borders with Style
disappearing with Netscape Navigator: 11.2.10. Disappearing Styles
inline: 1.4.6. Inline Styles
using on multiple pages: 1.2.3. Using Your Styles on Multiple Pages
styling common elements: 11.2.4. Styling Common Elements
stylistic languages: 1.2.6. Preparing for the Future
subscript (SUB) element: 4.1.3. Vertical Alignment
subscripting: 4.1.3.2. Superscripting and subscripting
superscript (SUP) element: 4.1.3. Vertical Alignment
superscripting: 4.1.3.2. Superscripting and subscripting
SVG (Scalable Vector Graphics): 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope


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positioning affects the placement of the first background image. We don't have to prevent the background image from repeating, though:

BODY {background-image: url(bigyinyang.gif);
background-position: -150px -100px;}

So, with the background repeating, we can see from Figure 6-48 that the tiling pattern starts with the position specified by background-position. This first image is known as the origin image , and it's very important to interesting effects. It acts much the same as settingauto on margins, but in positioning, this canpermit the creation of elements that are only as wide or tall as theyneed to be in order to display their content, without having toexactly specify how high or wide that will be. We'll explorethis in detail later in the chapter as well.

It is important to remember that the side-offset properties defineoffset from the analogous side (e.g., left definesthe offset from the left side) of the containing block, not from the

static

The element's box is generated as normal. Block-level elements generate a rectangular box that is part of the document's flow, and inline-level boxes are generated in the context of one or more line boxes that are flowed within their parent element.

relative
<P STYLE="font-size: 12px; line-height: 12px;">
This is text, <EM>some of which is emphasized</EM>, plus other text<BR>
which is <B STYLE="font-size: 24px;">boldfaced</B>
and <SPAN STYLE="vertical-align: top; line-height: 18px;">tall</SPAN>
and which is<BR>
larger than the surrounding text.
</P>

Since we've given the "tall" text a line-height of 18px , the difference between font-size and