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Index: O

oblique text: 5.4.1. Fonts with Style
octothorpe (#) preceding ID selectors: 2.3.2. ID Selectors
offsets (see side-offset properties)
Opera
CSS implementation in: 1.3.2. Implementations
padding and: 7.5.4. Padding: Known Issues
padding values, negative: 7.5. Padding
operating system, colors and: 10.5.2. Colors
order sorting: 2.8. The Cascade
ordered lists: 7.7.1. Types of Lists
7.7.2. List Item Images
origin image: 6.2.3.3. Length values
going to overcome any time soon.

It is left to individual authors to decide what chances they wish totake with using named colors, but at least with the specified sixteencolors, there is some moderate hope of consistency.

Okay, so that was the easiest way to specify color -- scary asthat may seem, it's true. The other four ways are a bit morecomplicated. The advantage is that with these methods, you canspecify any color in the 8-bit color spectrum, not just sixteen (or

origin sorting: 2.8. The Cascade
origins: 2.8. The Cascade
orphans property: 10.8.1. Paged Media
outline properties: 10.5.3. Outlines
overflow: 9.1.4. Content Overflow and Clipping
overflow-clip property: 9.1.4.2. Overflow clipping
overflow clipping: 9.1.4.2. Overflow clipping
overflow property: 9.1.4.1. Overflow
overlapping
elements, altering: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements
floated elements, preventing: 8.3.1. Floating: The Details
margins (see collapsing margins)
text, preventing: 8.4.3. Managing the Line Height of Inline Elements
overlining: 4.1.6. Text Decoration
overriding previously declared values: 11.1.3. Case 3: Putting a Magazine Article Online


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images that are inside a hyperlink. You might make them outset, so they have a "raised button" look, as depicted in Figure 7-31:

A:link IMG {border-style: outset;}
Figure 7-31

Figure 7-31. Applying an outset border to a hyperlinked image

Again, the color of the border is based on the element's value for color, which in this circumstance is likely to be blue (although we can't show that in print). This is due to the fact that the image is contained with a hyperlink, and theproperties in Chapter 10, "CSS2: A Look Ahead".

8.2.4. Block-Level Replaced Elements

Block-level replaced elements are also subject to a few differences in how formatting is handled. The most important is that replaced elements are assumed to have an intrinsic height and width; for example, an image will be a certain number of pixels high and wide. Given this,situation becomes.

Figure 7-20

Figure 7-20. The dangers of document-wide negative-margin rules

Using negative margins with block-level elementssuch as these can quite obviously be dangerous and is rarely worththe trouble -- but it can also be rewarding. It takes a good dealof practice, and many mistakes, to learn to tell the differencebetween the two.

could appear in a horizontal line and far exceed the edges of thecontaining block. Instead, if a float would stick out of itscontaining block by appearing next to another one, it is floated downto a point below any previous floats, as illustrated by Figure 8-36 (where the floats start on the next line inorder to more clearly illustrate the principle at work here). Thisrule first appeared in CSS2, to correct its omission in CSS1.

Figure 8-36

Figure 8-36. If there isn't room, floats get pushed to a new line

8. A floating element must be placed as high aspossible.