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Symbols | A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T line-height. As backwards as it may seem, in Figure 4-27, the value of line-heightis exactly the same for each and every line in the element, no matterhow far apart they may actually appear to be. This fact will come upagain in Section 4.1.3, "Vertical Alignment".

Figure 4-27

Figure 4-27. Tall images don't change line height

Again, the actual value for line-height in Figure 4-27 is the same for every line.

You can take advantage of the fact thatline-height can be set for any element, including | U | V | W | X | Y | Z

Index: M

margin-bottom property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin-left property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin property: 7.3. Margins
margin-right property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin-top property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margins: 7. Boxes and Borders
7.3. Margins
collapsing: 7.3.5. Collapsing Margins
block-level elements: 8.2.1.2. Collapsing vertical margins
floated elements: 7.6.1. Floated Elements
horizontal, noncollapsing: 8.2.2. Horizontal Formatting
inline elements and: 7.3.7. Margins and Inline Elements
caution with: 7.3.8. Margins: Known Issues
length values and: 7.3.1. Length Values and Margins
negative (see negative margins)
vs. padding: 7.2. Margins or Padding?
percentages and: 7.3.2. Percentages and Margins
replication: 7.3.3. Replicating Values
single side, setting margin for: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
table cells and: 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
markers: 8.2.3. List Items
8.2.3. List Items
10.4.2. Markers
matching hyphenated values: 10.2.2.5. Matching hyphenated values
matching single attribute values: 10.2.2.3. Matching single attribute values
max-height property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
max-width property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
media types: 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
10.8. Media Types and @-rules
Microsoft Internet Explorer (see Internet Explorer)
middle alignment: 4.1.3.5. In the middle
millimeters (mm): 3.2.1. Absolute Length Units
min-height property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
min-max properties: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
min-width property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
monospace fonts: 5.1. Font Families
multiple pages, using styles on: 1.2.3. Using Your Styles on Multiple Pages


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There is one thing to remember: vertical-align is not meant to affect the alignment of content in table cells, or within a block-level element. Under CSS1, there is no provision for duplicating markup such as <TD valign="top">. (This changes under CSS2; see Section 10.7, "Tables" in Chapter 10, "CSS2: A Look Ahead", for more details.)

So, let's see what can be done with vertical-align. This property applies only to inline elements, although that includes Something Like This . Instead of upper- and lowercase letters, a small-caps font employs uppercase letters of different sizes. Thus you might see something like the following, shown in Figure 5-29:

H1 {font-variant: small-caps;}
P {font-variant: normal;}
<H1>The Uses of font-variant</H1>