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Index: M

margin-bottom property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin-left property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin property: 7.3. Margins
margin-right property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin-top property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margins: 7. Boxes and Borders
7.3. Margins
collapsing: 7.3.5. Collapsing Margins
block-level elements: 8.2.1.2. Collapsing vertical margins
floated elements: 7.6.1. Floated Elements
horizontal, noncollapsing: 8.2.2. Horizontal Formatting
inline elements and: 7.3.7. Margins and Inline Elements
caution with: 7.3.8. Margins: Known Issues
length values and: 7.3.1. Length Values and Margins
negative (see negative margins)
vs. padding: 7.2. Margins or Padding?
percentages and: 7.3.2. Percentages and Margins
replication: 7.3.3. Replicating Values
single side, setting margin for: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
table cells and: 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
markers: 8.2.3. List Items
8.2.3. List Items
10.4.2. Markers
matching hyphenated values: 10.2.2.5. Matching hyphenated values
matching single attribute values: 10.2.2.3. Matching single attribute values
max-height property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
max-width property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
media types: 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
10.8. Media Types and @-rules
Microsoft Internet Explorer (see Internet Explorer)
middle alignment: 4.1.3.5. In the middle
millimeters (mm): 3.2.1. Absolute Length Units
min-height property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
min-max properties: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
min-width property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
monospace fonts: 5.1. Font Families
without increasing the height. This could possibly mean adding a scrollbar to the element, as shown in Figure 8-4.

Figure 8-4

Figure 8-4. One way to handle a short height on a tall element

In practice, most browsers will not do this. They will instead simply increase the height of the element, as though the value of height had been set to auto. This is permitted under CSS1, which states that browsers can ignore any value of height other than auto if an element is not a replaced element such

multiple pages, using styles on: 1.2.3. Using Your Styles on Multiple Pages


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Example

text-indentIE4 Y/Y IE5 Y/Y NN4 Y/Y Op3 Y/-

Used to set the indentation of thefirst line of an element. This is most often used to create a tabeffect for Negative values are permitted, and cause "hangingindents."

text-transformIE4 Y/Y IE5 Y/Y NN4 Y/Y Op3 P/-

This property changes the case of theletters in the element, regardless of the case of the original text.The selection of letters to be capitalized by the value

H1 {padding: 10px; background-color: silver;}
Figure 7-56

Figure 7-56. Padding applied to an H1 element

On the other hand, we might want H1 elements to have uneven padding and H2 elements to have regular padding, as shown in Figure 7-57:

H1 {padding: 10px 0.25em 3ex 3cm;} /* uneven padding */
H2 {padding: 0.5em 2em;} /* values replicate to the bottom and left sides */
Figure 7-57

Figure 7-57. Uneven padding

  • Create your own Java object model (adapter) that uses DOM to manipulate the information in your document object tree (that is created by the parser). This is slightly different from the 2nd option, because you are still using the DOM API to manipulate the document information as a tree of nodes, but you are just wrapping an application specific API around the DOM objects, so its easier for you to write the code. So your object model is an adapter on top of DOM (ie, it uses the adapter pattern). This application specific API uses DOM and actually accesses or modifies information by going to the tree of nodes. Changes made to the object model still have to be made persistence (if you want to save any changes). You are in essence creating a thin layer on top of the tree of nodes that the parser creates, where the tree of nodes is accessed or modified eventually depending on what methods you invoke on your object model.
  • Depending on which of the three options you use to access information using your Java classes, this information must at some point be saved back to a file (probably to the one from which it was read). When the user of your application invokes a File->Save action, the information in the application must be written out to an ApplicationML file. Now this information is stored in memory, either as a (DOM) tree of nodes, or in your own proprietary object model. Also note that most DOM XML parsers can generate XML code from DOM document objects (but its quite trivial to turn a tree of nodes into XML by writing the code to do it yourself). There are 2 basic ways to get this information back into an ApplicationML file: