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Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book

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Index: M

margin-bottom property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin-left property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin property: 7.3. Margins
margin-right property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margin-top property: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
margins: 7. Boxes and Borders
7.3. Margins
collapsing: 7.3.5. Collapsing Margins
block-level elements: 8.2.1.2. Collapsing vertical margins
floated elements: 7.6.1. Floated Elements
horizontal, noncollapsing: 8.2.2. Horizontal Formatting
inline elements and: 7.3.7. Margins and Inline Elements
caution with: 7.3.8. Margins: Known Issues
length values and: 7.3.1. Length Values and Margins
negative (see negative margins)
vs. padding: 7.2. Margins or Padding?
percentages and: 7.3.2. Percentages and Margins
replication: 7.3.3. Replicating Values
single side, setting margin for: 7.3.4. Single-Side Margin Properties
table cells and: 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
very common example of an increased font weight. Generally speaking,the darker and "more bold" a font appears, the heavier itis said to be. There are a great many ways to label the heaviness offonts. For example, the font family known as Zurich has a number ofvariants such as Zurich Bold, Zurich Black, Zurich UltraBlack, ZurichLight, and Zurich Regular. Each of these uses the same basic font,but each has a different weight.

So let's say that you want to use Zurich for a document, butyou'd like to make use of all those different heaviness levels.

markers: 8.2.3. List Items
8.2.3. List Items
10.4.2. Markers
matching hyphenated values: 10.2.2.5. Matching hyphenated values
matching single attribute values: 10.2.2.3. Matching single attribute values
max-height property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
max-width property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
media types: 1.3.1. Limited Initial Scope
10.8. Media Types and @-rules
Microsoft Internet Explorer (see Internet Explorer)
middle alignment: 4.1.3.5. In the middle
millimeters (mm): 3.2.1. Absolute Length Units
min-height property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
min-max properties: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
min-width property: 9.1.3.2. Limiting width and height
monospace fonts: 5.1. Font Families
multiple pages, using styles on: 1.2.3. Using Your Styles on Multiple Pages


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The background color of just about any element can be set, fromBODY all the way down to inline elements such asEM and A. Even form elementsshould be affected by the property, although not all user agents cando this correctly. Also,background-color is not inherited. Its defaultvalue istransparent, position of the tiling is dependent on the value ofbackground-position.

Example

BODY {background-image: url(bg41.gif);}H2 {background-image: url(http://www.pix.org/dots.png);}

Example

BODY {background-position: top center;}
directions alongthe specified axis. The repeating of a background image begins with
B {font-weight: bold;}

This says, simply, that the B element should bedisplayed using a boldface font; or, to put it another way, a fontthat is heavier than is normal for the document, as shown in Figure 5-8. This is what we're used to, of course,since B does cause text to be boldfaced.

Figure 5-8

Figure 5-8. Making the B tag bold

However, what's really happening is that a heavier variant ofthe font is used for displaying a B element. Thus,if you have a paragraph displayed using Times, and part of it is styles for nested lists because the user agent's style sheet may already have defined such styles. Assume that a UA has the following styles defined:

UL {list-style-type: disc;}
UL UL {list-style-type: circle;}
UL UL UL {list-style-type: square;}

If this is so, and it's likely that it will be, you will have to declare your own styles to overcome the UA's styles. Inheritance won't be enough in such a case.

Note that the boldface element in this case is positioned in relationto its parent element's content box, which defines itscontaining block. Without the relative positioning of the parentelement, the containing block would be another element. Consider acase where the element being positioned is a child of theBODY element, e.g., a paragraph or headingelement. With the right styles, the containing block for thepositioned element will be the entire BODYelement. Thus, applying the following styles to theBODY and the fifth paragraph in a document would