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Index: E

element boxes: 7.1. Basic Element Boxes
8.1. Basic Boxes
element clipping: 9.1.4.3. Element clipping
element selectors: 2.1.1. Rule Structure
elements
classification of: 2.9. Classification of Elements
floated (see floated elements)
overlapping, altering: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements
styling common: 11.2.4. Styling Common Elements
visibility of: 9.1.5. Element Visibility
elevation property: 10.8.2. The Spoken Word
em box: 5.3. Font Size
em-height (em): 3.2.2.1. em and ex units
em length value: 5.3.3. Percentages and Sizes
em square: 5.3. Font Size
embedded style sheets: 1.4.2. The STYLE Element
ex-height (ex): 3.2.2.1. em and ex units
Extensible Markup Language (see XML)
external style sheets: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
creating: 11.1.1. Case 1: Consistent Look and Feel
loading
with @import directive: 1.4.3. The @import Directive
with LINK element: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
be done under CSS2 and is briefly discussed in Chapter 10, "CSS2: A Look Ahead".

7.7.3. List Item Positions

There is one other thing you can do to influence the appearance of list items under CSS1, and that's change the position of the bullet itself, in relation to the content of the list item. This is accomplished with list-style-position.

extra space around elements, adding: 7.2. Margins or Padding?
7.2. Margins or Padding?
(see also margins)


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The applications that you create with Java and XML will rely on the services provided by your Java XML Parser (using DOM or SAX). The information itself might be stored in a variety of persistence engines (object databases, relational databases, file systems, dynamic websites, etc.). The information however that comes out of these persistence storage engines must be converted to XML (if they are not in XML already). Once this is done, you have to be concerned with the material covered in this document. This document outlines the most popular Java XML application categories that are possible in an environment where data is encoded with XML, where web access is ubiquitous and platform independence is a necessity.

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

In your application layer, you can create many interesting Java applications. The apps can run on the server side or client side or both. They may have graphical user interfaces or they may be web based. When I use the word application or app in this chapter, I don't exclude Java applets; I mean application (or app) in the broad sense of the word, i.e., I mean it to describe a software system written in Java that solves a real-world problem.

addition, there will likely be conditions where you'll want to limit how high or wide a positioned element gets, not to mention cases where you want the browser to go ahead and automatically calculate the width, or the height, or both.

9.1.3.1. Setting width and height

If you want to give your positioned element a specific width, then the obvious property to turn to is width. Similarly,sed diam nonummy nibh euismod tincidunt ut <SPAN CLASS="change">***</SPAN> laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat.</P>

While this does rely on inserting an extra element, the advantage is that the SPAN can be placed anywhere in the paragraph and still have the result depicted in Figure 9-21.

Figure 9-21

Figure 9-21. Setting a "change bar" with absolute positioning

However, maybe we'd like to place the change marker next to whatever line was changed. In that case, we need to make only one small alteration to our styles, and we'll get the result shown