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Index: E

element boxes: 7.1. Basic Element Boxes
8.1. Basic Boxes
element clipping: 9.1.4.3. Element clipping
element selectors: 2.1.1. Rule Structure
elements
classification of: 2.9. Classification of Elements
floated (see floated elements)
overlapping, altering: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements
styling common: 11.2.4. Styling Common Elements
visibility of: 9.1.5. Element Visibility
elevation property: 10.8.2. The Spoken Word
em box: 5.3. Font Size
em-height (em): 3.2.2.1. em and ex units
em length value: 5.3.3. Percentages and Sizes
em square: 5.3. Font Size
embedded style sheets: 1.4.2. The STYLE Element
ex-height (ex): 3.2.2.1. em and ex units
Extensible Markup Language (see XML)
external style sheets: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
creating: 11.1.1. Case 1: Consistent Look and Feel
loading
with @import directive: 1.4.3. The @import Directive
with LINK element: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
extra space around elements, adding: 7.2. Margins or Padding?
7.2. Margins or Padding?
(see also margins)


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Again, all of this is only true for the top and bottom sides ofinline elements; the left and right sides are a different story.We'll start by considering the simple case of a small inlineelement within a single line, as depicted in Figure 7-52.

Figure 7-52

Figure 7-52. An inline element

Here, if we set values for the left or right border, not only willthey be visible, but they'll displace the text around them, aswe see in Figure 7-53:

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The equivalents for the various rainbow primaries, plus a few others,are presented in Table 3-1.

Table 3-1. Numeric RGB Equivalents for Common Colors

It is also possible, at least in theory, to use fractional values.For example, you might want a color to be exactly 25.5% red, 40%green, and 98.6% blue. Not a problem:

H2 {color: rgb(25.5%,40%,98.6%);}

Introduction

The applications that you create with Java and XML will rely on the services provided by your Java XML Parser (using DOM or SAX). The information itself might be stored in a variety of persistence engines (object databases, relational databases, file systems, dynamic websites, etc.). The information however that comes out of these persistence storage engines must be converted to XML (if they are not in XML already). Once this is done, you have to be concerned with the material covered in this document. This document outlines the most popular Java XML application categories that are possible in an environment where data is encoded with XML, where web access is ubiquitous and platform independence is a necessity.

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

that has been pinned to a specific size, and the content doesn't fit. You can take control of the situation with the overflow property.

overflow

This property only applies in one (or more) the following cases: