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Index: E

element boxes: 7.1. Basic Element Boxes
8.1. Basic Boxes
element clipping: 9.1.4.3. Element clipping
element selectors: 2.1.1. Rule Structure
elements
classification of: 2.9. Classification of Elements
floated (see floated elements)
overlapping, altering: 9.5. Stacking Positioned Elements
styling common: 11.2.4. Styling Common Elements
visibility of: 9.1.5. Element Visibility
elevation property: 10.8.2. The Spoken Word
em box: 5.3. Font Size
em-height (em): 3.2.2.1. em and ex units
em length value: 5.3.3. Percentages and Sizes
em square: 5.3. Font Size
Figure 9-23

Figure 9-23. Nested absolutely positioned elements

The small box B in the lower-left corner of the element A is a childof A, which is in turn a child of a relatively positionedDIV. B was absolutely positioned, as was elementA, using styles like these:

DIV {position: relative;}P.A {position: absolute; top: 0; right: 0; width: 15em; height: auto;margin-left: auto;}P.B {position: absolute; bottom: 0; left: 0; width: 10em; height: 50%;


embedded style sheets: 1.4.2. The STYLE Element
ex-height (ex): 3.2.2.1. em and ex units
Extensible Markup Language (see XML)
external style sheets: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
creating: 11.1.1. Case 1: Consistent Look and Feel
loading
with @import directive: 1.4.3. The @import Directive
with LINK element: 1.4.1. The LINK Tag
extra space around elements, adding: 7.2. Margins or Padding?
7.2. Margins or Padding?
(see also margins)


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paragraph. This will affect every line in the entire element, not just the line in which the bordered hyperlink appears:

A:link {border: 5px solid blue;}
P {font-size: 14px; line-height: 24px;}

Because there is extra space added above and below each line, the border around the hyperlink doesn't impinge on any other line, as we can see in Figure 8-63.

Figure 8-63

Figure 8-63. Increasing line-height to leave room for inline borders

table -- should be gray. This is accomplished as follows:

BODY * UL {color: gray;}

Figure 10-3 shows the result of this declaration.

Figure 10-3

Figure 10-3. Making BODY's grandchildren (and their descendants) gray

On the other hand, perhaps you wish to make purple any element thatis a descendant of DIV. This would be written:

DIV * {color: purple;}

At first glance, this seems no different than if the

In CSS2, the range of values for display is dramatically expanded.See Chapter 10, "CSS2: A Look Ahead", for more details.

Example

.hide {display: none;}

Values

block | inline |list-item | none

Default

changes made to the structure of each letter to account for thealtered appearance. This is especially true of serif fonts, where inaddition to the fact that the text characters "lean," theserifs may be altered in an italic face. Oblique text, on the otherhand, is simply a slanted version of the normal, upright text. Fontfaces with labels like Italic, Cursive,and Kursivare usually mapped to the italic keyword, while

XML is derived from SGML, and so was HTML. So in essence, the current infrastructure available today to deal with HTML content can be re-used to work with XML. This is a very big advantage towards delivering XML content using the software and networking infrastructure already in place today. This should be a big plus in considering XML for use in any of your projects, because XML naturally lends itself to being used over the web.

Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible