Figure 8-60

Figure 8-60. Inline margins and line-box layout

8.4.3. Managing the Line Height of Inline Elements

In the previous section, we had a few cases where changing the line-height of an inline element led to the possibility of text from one line overlapping another. In each case, though, the changes were made on individual elements. So how can we affect the line-height of Thursday 23rd of March 2017 09:03:27 PM

by Eric A. Meyer
ISBN 1-56592-622-6
First edition, published May 2000.
(See the
catalog page for this book.)

Search the text of Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide.

Table of Contents

Copyright Page
Preface
Chapter 1: HTML and CSS
Chapter 2: Selectors and Structure
Chapter 3: Units and Values
Chapter 4: Text Properties
Chapter 5: Fonts
Chapter 6: Colors and Backgrounds
Chapter 7: Boxes and Borders
Chapter 8: Visual Formatting
Chapter 9: Positioning
Chapter 10: CSS2: A Look Ahead
Chapter 11: CSS in Action
Appendix A: CSS Resources
Appendix B: HTML 2.0 Style Sheet
Appendix C: CSS1 Properties
Appendix D: CSS Support Chart
Index
Colophon
Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

below 7pt, it will become unreadably small on most monitors (and will be tough to read even on most printouts).

You're probably thinking to yourself, "Ha! How dumb do you have to be to shrink text in lists like that?" True, it's easy to spot this with lists. However, think about how most of your pages are structured (with nested tables) and then consider this rule:

BODY {font-size: 12pt;}
book is upright, for instance.

Thatleaves only an explanation of the difference betweenitalic and oblique text. Forthat, it's easiest to turn to Figure 5-24,which illustrates the differences very clearly.