Monday 20th of October 2014 11:40:02 AM

by Eric A. Meyer
ISBN 1-56592-622-6
First edition, published May 2000.
(See the catalog page for this book.)

Search the text of Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide.

Table of Contents

Copyright Page
Preface
Chapter 1: HTML and CSS
Chapter 2: Selectors and Structure
Chapter 3: Units and Values
Chapter 4: Text Properties
Chapter 5: Fonts
Chapter 6: Colors and Backgrounds
Chapter 7: Boxes and Borders
Chapter 8: Visual Formatting
all). JPEGs use a "lossy" compression that reduces image quality; GIFs and PNGs have lossless compression.  The next chapter covers image editing strategies, etc.  Here we just summarize image placement on the page with the <IMG> tag:
  Here's an  in-line greyscale image with default settings and unpredicable placement on the page.  Chapter 9: Positioning
Chapter 10: CSS2: A Look Ahead
Chapter 11: CSS in Action
Appendix A: CSS Resources
Appendix B: HTML 2.0 Style Sheet
Appendix C: CSS1 Properties
Appendix D: CSS Support Chart
Index
Colophon
Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

XML parsers allow you to code faster by giving you a parser for your all your XML documents (with and without DTDs).

XML documents are easily committed to a persistence layer

XML documents may be stored in files or databases. When stored in files, XML documents are simply plain text files with tags (and possibly DTDs). It is very easy to save your XML documents to a text file and pass the text file around to other machines, platforms and programs (as long as they can understand the data). In the worst case scenario, XML documents (files) can be viewed in a text editor on just about any platform.

XML documents are also naturally committed to a database (relational or object) or any other kind of XML document store. There are commercial products available which allow you to save XML documents to an XML storage layer (which is not a database per se), like Datachannel's XStore and ODI's eXcelon. These XML store solutions are quite expensive ($10,000 to $20,000 range).

line-height on a block-level element sets aminimum line-box height for the content of thatblock-level element. Thus, declaring P.spacious{line-height: 24pt;} means thatthe minimum height for each line box is 24 points. Technically, theonly way content will inherit this line height is if it is inheritedby an inline element. Most text isn't contained by an inlineelement. Thus, if we pretend that each line is contained by thefictional LINE element, then the model works outvery nicely. taken the value gray from the foreground color ofthe paragraph itself. The second paragraph, on the other hand, has ablack border because that color was explicitly assigned usingborder-color.

While it's nice to haveshorthand properties like border-color andborder-style, they aren't always a whole lotof help. For example, you might want to set all H1elements to have a thick, gray, solid border, but only along the

If, on the other hand, the height isless than that needed to display the content:

<P STYLE="height: 3em;">

then the browser is supposed to provide a way to see all contentwithout increasing the height. This could possibly mean adding ascrollbar to the element, as shown in Figure 8-4.

Figure 8-4

Figure 8-4. One way to handle a short height on a tall element

In practice, most browsers will not do this. They will instead simply