Wednesday 28th of June 2017 07:14:33 AM

by Eric A. Meyer
ISBN 1-56592-622-6
First edition, published May 2000.
(See the catalog page for this book.)

Search the text of Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide.

Table of Contents

Copyright Page
Preface
Chapter 1: HTML and CSS
Chapter 2: Selectors and Structure
Chapter 3: Units and Values
Chapter 4: Text Properties
Chapter 5: Fonts

If you set an element to have a weight of bolder, then the user agent first must determine what font-weight was inherited from the parent element. It then selects the lowest number which corresponds to a font weight darker than what was inherited. If none is available, then the user agent sets the element's font weight to the next numerical value, unless the value is already 900, in which case the weight remains at 900. Thus, you might Chapter 6: Colors and Backgrounds
Chapter 7: Boxes and Borders
Chapter 8: Visual Formatting
Chapter 9: Positioning
Chapter 10: CSS2: A Look Ahead
Chapter 11: CSS in Action
Appendix A: CSS Resources
Appendix B: HTML 2.0 Style Sheet
Appendix C: CSS1 Properties
Appendix D: CSS Support Chart
Index
Colophon


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The applications that you create with Java and XML will rely on the services provided by your Java XML Parser (using DOM or SAX). The information itself might be stored in a variety of persistence engines (object databases, relational databases, file systems, dynamic websites, etc.). The information however that comes out of these persistence storage engines must be converted to XML (if they are not in XML already). Once this is done, you have to be concerned with the material covered in this document. This document outlines the most popular Java XML application categories that are possible in an environment where data is encoded with XML, where web access is ubiquitous and platform independence is a necessity.

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

In your application layer, you can create many interesting Java applications. The apps can run on the server side or client side or both. They may have graphical user interfaces or they may be web based. When I use the word application or app in this chapter, I don't exclude Java applets; I mean application (or app) in the broad sense of the word, i.e., I mean it to describe a software system written in Java that solves a real-world problem.

such as these can quite obviously be dangerous and is rarely worth the trouble -- but it can also be rewarding. It takes a good deal of practice, and many mistakes, to learn to tell the difference between the two.

7.3.7. Margins and Inline Elements

So far, we've only talked about how margins apply to block-level elements like paragraphs and Figure 7-86 shows one possibility.

Figure 7-86

Figure 7-86. Placing the bullets inside and outside list items

CSS2, by the way, provides a good deal more control over thepositioning of the bullets (called "markers" in CSS2);again, this is discussed in Chapter 10, "CSS2: A Look Ahead".

7.7.4. List Styles In Shorthand