Wednesday 23rd of July 2014 01:53:03 PM

by Eric A. Meyer
ISBN 1-56592-622-6
First edition, published May 2000.
(See the catalog page for this book.)

Search the text of Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide.

Table of Contents

Copyright Page
Preface
Chapter 1: HTML and CSS
Chapter 2: Selectors and Structure
Chapter 3: Units and Values
Chapter 4: Text Properties
Chapter 5: Fonts
Chapter 6: Colors and Backgrounds
Chapter 7: Boxes and Borders
Chapter 8: Visual Formatting
Chapter 9: Positioning
Chapter 10: CSS2: A Look Ahead
Chapter 11: CSS in Action
Appendix A: CSS Resources
Appendix B: HTML 2.0 Style Sheet

8.2.2.3. More than one auto

Now let us consider the cases where two of these three properties areset to auto. If both the margins are set toauto, then they are set to equal lengths, thuscentering the element within its parent, as you can see from Figure 8-14:

P {width: 100px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;}
Appendix C: CSS1 Properties
Appendix D: CSS Support Chart
Index
Colophon
Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

very common example of an increased font weight. Generally speaking, the darker and "more bold" a font appears, the heavier it is said to be. There are a great many ways to label the heaviness of fonts. For example, the font family known as Zurich has a number of variants such as Zurich Bold, Zurich Black, Zurich UltraBlack, Zurich Light, and Zurich Regular. Each of these uses the same basic font, but each has a different weight.

So let's say that you want to use Zurich for a document, but you'd like to make use of all those different heaviness levels.face exists, but there is no defined Oblique face -- the useragent may not substitute the former for the latter, according to theCSS specification. Finally, the user agent can simply generate theoblique face by computing a slanted version of the upright font. Infact, this is what most often happens in a digital world, whereit's fairly easy to slant a font using a simple computation.

Furthermore, you may find that in some operating systems, a givenfont that has been declared to be italic mayswitch from being italic to oblique depending on the actual size of