Monday 23rd of October 2017 02:45:19 AM

by Eric A. Meyer
ISBN 1-56592-622-6
First edition, published May 2000.
(See the catalog page for this book.)

Search the text of Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide.

Table of Contents

Copyright Page
Preface
Chapter 1: HTML and CSS
Chapter 2: Selectors and Structure
Chapter 3: Units and Values
Chapter 4: Text Properties
Chapter 5: Fonts
declared in order to make a text element float successfully. Internet Explorer 4.x for Windows does.

Also, you must have the final version of Explorer 4.x for this to work -- so if you're still using a preview release, you'll need to upgrade it, which is probably a good idea anyway. (Thanks to Howard Marvel for discovering and sharing this trick.)

Chapter 6: Colors and Backgrounds
Chapter 7: Boxes and Borders
Chapter 8: Visual Formatting
Chapter 9: Positioning
Chapter 10: CSS2: A Look Ahead
Chapter 11: CSS in Action
Appendix A: CSS Resources
Appendix B: HTML 2.0 Style Sheet
Appendix C: CSS1 Properties
Appendix D: CSS Support Chart
Index
Colophon
Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

WARNING

Something else to watch out for is Navigator 4's handling ofvalues for color that it doesn't recognize.If Navigator 4 encounters an unknown word (such asinvalidValue) somehow, through mechanisms knownonly to itself, it actually arrives at and uses a color. Itdoesn't do so randomly, exactly, but the effect is practicallythe same. For example, invalidValue comes out as adark blue, and inherit, which is a valid valueFinally, a problem related to, but notexactly about, CSS. Some authors have reported trouble with gettingtheir web hosts to correctly serve up external style sheets. Apparently, withsome web servers, the file extension .css ismapped to the MIME typex-application/css, or "Continuous SlideShow," instead of the MIME type text/css.Even older servers may not have any mapping for.css, and so will serve up the files astext/plain.

The simplest category of XML Java applications is the kind of Java application that stores information in XML documents (files). This is illustrated in Figure 1. By using XML to create your own markup languages (i.e. your own file formats for your information) in an open way, you don't have to use propietary and binary file formats. Using XML over proprietary binary file formats, allows your applications to have immense inter operability across platforms, applications and even programming languages. Since any kind of markup language can be defined using XML (you can even formalize it by creating a DTD for it) applications can store their information using their own markup languages. For example, address book information can be stored in an AddressBookML file. A few commercial programs currently available allow saving their application data to XML files, e.g., Framemaker can save its documents as XML files.

In order to create applications of this category, you might have to define a DTD for your information. Then you have to write classes to import and export information from your XML document(s) (validating using your application's DTD if you have one). You must also write the classes which create the user interface in your application. The user of your application can view and modify information using the GUI (graphical user interface), and they can save (and load) their information to (and from) an XML file (that might use your DTD); in other words, they can save (and load) their information to (and from) an ApplicationML file (where Application is the name of your application). Some examples are AddressBookML, MathML, SVGML, etc.

The classes that import and export information from your ApplicationML file must use the parser and SAX or DOM API in order to import the information. These classes can access this information by using one of the following strategies:

  1. Use DOM to directly manipulate the information stored in the document (which DOM turns into a tree of nodes). This document object is created by the DOM XML parser after it reads in the XML document. This option leads to messy and hard-to-understand code. Also, this works better for document-type data rather than just computer generated data (like data structures and objects used in your code).