Book HomeCascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book Monday 30th of May 2016 04:59:17 AM

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Values

none | dotted |dashed | solid |double | groove |ridge | inset |outset

There are nine distinct styles for the

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

XML supports shareable structure (using DTDs)

Since the structure of the XML document can be specified in DTDs they provide a simple way to make it easier to exchange XML documents that conform to a DTD. For example, if two software systems need to exchange information, then if both of the systems conform to one DTD, the two systems can process information from each other. DTDs are not as powerful as some kind of schema architecture for XML, they don't support typing, subclassing, or instantiation mechanisms that a schema architecture must have.

DTDs are a simple way to make sure that 2 or more XML documents are of the same "type". Its a very limited approach to making "typed" XML documents shareable across systems. In the future some kind of schema system will be proposed by the W3C that should allow typing, instantiation and inheritance of information (in XML).

XML enables interoperability

Oblique, Slanted, and Incline.

If you wanted to make sure that a document uses italic text in familiar ways, you could write a style sheet like this:

P {font-style: normal;}
EM, I {font-style: italic;}
line.

Now let's talk about top and bottom padding. In theory, aninline element with a background color and padding could have thebackground extend above and below the element. Figure 7-61 gives us some idea of what that might looklike. The line height isn't changed, of course, but sincepadding does extend the background, it should be visible, right?

Here's where the famous phrase returns: "there may beimplementation-specific limits." User agents aren't