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10.6. Borders

In CSS1, there are quite a few properties devoted to setting borders around element boxes, such as border-top-width and border-color, not to mention border itself. CSS2 adds a even more border properties, most of which are aimed at giving the author even more specific control of the borders. Before, it was difficult to set a specific color or style for a given side of the border, except through properties like border-left, and that Even if clients don't support XML natively, it is not a big hindrance. In fact, Java with Servlets (on the server side) can convert XML with stylesheets to generate plain HTML that can be displayed in all web browsers.

Using XML to pass parameters and return values on servers makes it very easy to allow these servers to be web-enabled. A thin server side Java layer might be added that interacts with web browsers using HTML and translates the requests and responses from the client into XML, that is then fed into the server.

XML is totally extensible

By not predefining any tags in the XML Recommendation, the W3C allowed developers full control over customizing their data as they see fit. This makes XML very attractive to encoding data that already exists in legacy databases (by using database metadata, and other schema information). This extensibility of XML makes it such a great fit when trying to get different systems to work with each other.

XML supports shareable structure (using DTDs)

could require more than one value. The new CSS2 properties address this, and their names are pretty self-explanatory:

border-top-color
border-right-color
border-bottom-color
border-left-color
border-top-style
border-right-style
border-bottom-style
border-left-style


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"trouble" -- that is, TRBL, for "Top Right Bottom Left."

It's also possible to mix up the types of length value you use. You aren't restricted to using a single length type in a given rule, as shown here:

H2 {margin: 14px 5em 0.1in 3ex;}  /* value variety! */

Figure 7-9 shows us, with a little extra behaviors for handling tables and table content, and these newfeatures behave in ways fairly distinct from either block-level orinline formatting. See Section 10.1, "Changes from CSS1" for an overview.

8.4.1. Line Layout

First, we need to understand how inlinecontent is laid out. It isn't as simple and straightforward asHere are some benefits of the structured nature of XML:

<P>This spacious paragraph features <SMALL>tiny text which is proportionally spacious</SMALL>, which is what the author probably wanted.</P>
Figure 4-53

Figure 4-53. Overcoming inherited letterspacing.

The default value none will simply leave the text alone and use whatever capitalization exists in the source document. uppercase and lowercase cause the text to be converted into all upper- or lowercase