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10.5. Adapting to the Environment

CSS2 offers the ability to both alter the browser's environment and integrate its look more closely to that of the user's operating system.

10.5.1. Cursors

document's file size can decrease by as much as 50% !

11.1.3. Case 3: Putting a Magazine Article Online

Finally, we turn to the situation faced by the editorial offices of Meerkat Monthly. This specialist magazine examines the issues of raising a suricate in a domestic environment, away from others of its kind, and also provides general information about the animals themselves. In an

To achieve the former, we have the cursor property, which lets you declare what shape the browser's cursor will take as it passes over a given element. Want to make a humorous point about download times? Change the cursor to the wait cursor (an hourglass or watch) when the cursor passes over hyperlinks. You can even hook this property up to "cursor files" (which are not defined by the specification), so you could theoretically class your anchors based on where they go and load different icons for each type of link. For example, off-site links could cause the cursor to change into a globe, while links intended to provide help could trigger a question-mark cursor.

10.5.2. Colors

In order to let web pages more closely match the user's desktop environment, there are a whole list of new color keywords like button-highlight, three-d-shadow, and gray-text. These are all intended to use the colors of the user's operating system. In all, there are 27 of these new color keywords. I won't list them all out here, but they're listed in Table 10-1, found at the end of this chapter.

10.5.3. Outlines

While you're moving your cursor around, you might want to show where the focus is set. For example, it might be nice to define a button so that it gets a red box around it when the cursor moves over it. Well, there a number of outline properties, including outline, outline-color, outline-style, and outline-width. To use the example of a red box, you might declare:

IMG.button:hover {outline: solid red 1px;}

This should have the effect described. The outline styles could also be used to set a visible outline for regions in a client-side image map.



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browser may vary.

In the case of ordered lists, CSS2 goes a great deal further than CSS1 to provide control over the ordering. For example, there is no way in CSS1 to automatically create subsection counters such as "2.1" or "7.1.3." This can, however, be done under CSS2 and is briefly discussed in Chapter 10, "CSS2: A Look Ahead".

Figure 10-10

Figure 10-10. Changing styles based on language

Even if this isn't something you're likely to use often, it can still come in very handy. For example, you could define styles to apply to entire documents:

HTML:lang(de) {color: black; background: yellow;}

Thus would all HTML documents marked as German be shown as black text on a yellow background. This marking could be made with the lang attribute, in a META tag in the document's head, or even as a value in the

The 2nd category of Java applications called Java Application Servers (or app servers) and they make good use of XML. Unlike client side graphical Java apps (from the previous section) which are very standalone in their operations, app servers tie many different networked software components together in order to provide information from multiple sources to a set of client side Java apps or web browsers (maybe even running on different devices). This is shown in Figure 2. An app server is actually a conglomeration of several distributed and client/server software systems. So when you write an app server, you are actually writing many different software systems which are all networked to work together, to process information that comes from various sources, and distribute this information to a set of client apps (that you also have to write) running on different devices and platforms.

How can XML help app servers do their work? As you can see in Figure 2, in order for the app server to harvest information from such a rich variety of sources, there must be some common ground between all of these sources (each of which might be running on a different hardware and software system). This common ground is the information which flows throughout the entire system, regardless of what source the information comes from. CORBA is an example of tying disparate systems together based on the interfaces that certain remote objects implement. XML does the same thing for data. It allows these disparate systems to share information in a medium that consists only of pure information (and the structural relationships that exist inside of that information). By taking the lowest common denominator approach by using plain text to encode data, XML allows these systems to talk with each other without requiring any special binary information format converters or other service layers to translate between binary formats (for encoding data). Also, since HTTP already supports transmission of plain text, it is completely natural to move XML around using the Hyper Text Transfer Protocol through firewalls and disparate networks. This is shown in Figure 3. XML can be transmitted between systems using one of the most prevalent protocols in use today, Hypertext Transfer Protocol or HTTP 1.1 (which is the protocol of the web).