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on the first paragraph.</P></DIV>
Figure 7-10

Figure 7-10. Parent widths and percentages

While this is interesting enough, consider the case of elementswithout a declared width, whose overall width(including margins) is therefore dependent on thewidth of the parent element.

P {margin: 10%}

Figure 7-11 shows how the margin of a paragraphchanges as it's viewed in browsers windows of two different

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on a single side of the box, without affecting the other sides.

padding-top, padding-right, padding-bottom, padding-left

Values

<length> | <percentage>

The meaning of these values is shown inTable 7-1.

Table 7-1. Values of the list-style property and their results

These properties can only be applied to any element that has adisplay of list-item , ofcourse, but CSS doesn't distinguish betweenordered andunordered

Inherited

no

Applies to
width. The result of this markup is exactly thesame as that shown in Figure 8-13:

P {margin-left: 100px; margin-right: 100px;} /* same as before */

WARNING

In practice, only browsers released in early 1999 or later correctlyhandle auto, and not even all of them get itright. Those that do not handle auto marginscorrectly will behave in inconsistent ways, but the safest bet is toassume that they will set both margins to zero. The browsers that doUse DOM to directly manipulate the information stored in the document (which DOM turns into a tree of nodes). This document object is created by the DOM XML parser after it reads in the XML document. This option leads to messy and hard-to-understand code. Also, this works better for document-type data rather than just computer generated data (like data structures and objects used in your code).

  • Create your own Java object model that imports information from the XML document by using either SAX or DOM. This kind of object model only uses SAX or DOM to initialize itself with the information contained in the XML document(s). Once the parsing and initialization of your object model is completed, DOM or SAX isn't used anymore. You can use your own object model to accessed or modify your information without using SAX or DOM anymore. So you manipulate your information using your own objects, and rely on the SAX or DOM APIs to import the information from your ApplicationML file into memory (as a bunch of Java objects). You can think of this object model as an in-memory instance of the information that came was "serialized" in your XML document(s). Changes made to this object model are made persistent automatically, you have to deal with persistence issues (ie, write code to save your object model to a persistence layer as XML).
  • Create your own Java object model (adapter) that uses DOM to manipulate the information in your document object tree (that is created by the parser). This is slightly different from the 2nd option, because you are still using the DOM API to manipulate the document information as a tree of nodes, but you are just wrapping an application specific API around the DOM objects, so its easier for you to write the code. So your object model is an adapter on top of DOM (ie, it uses the adapter pattern). This application specific API uses DOM and actually accesses or modifies information by going to the tree of nodes. Changes made to the object model still have to be made persistence (if you want to save any changes). You are in essence creating a thin layer on top of the tree of nodes that the parser creates, where the tree of nodes is accessed or modified eventually depending on what methods you invoke on your object model.
  • Depending on which of the three options you use to access information using your Java classes, this information must at some point be saved back to a file (probably to the one from which it was read). When the user of your application invokes a File->Save action, the information in the application must be written out to an ApplicationML file. Now this information is stored in memory, either as a (DOM) tree of nodes, or in your own proprietary object model. Also note that most DOM XML parsers can generate XML code from DOM document objects (but its quite trivial to turn a tree of nodes into XML by writing the code to do it yourself). There are 2 basic ways to get this information back into an ApplicationML file: