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Theidea behind positioning is fairly simple. It allows you to defineexactly where element boxes will appear relative to where they wouldordinarily be -- or relative to a parent element, or anotherelement, or even to the browser window itself. The power of thisfeature is both obvious and surprising. It shouldn't be toosurprising to learn that this is the part of CSS2 that user agentsusually first attempt to support. Given that there were some verygood positioning implementations on the horizon as the book was beingcompleted, we felt it worthwhile to give readers a glimpse of

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assume that they will set both margins to zero. The browsers that do get this right are Internet Explorer 4.5 and 5 for Macintosh, and Opera 3.6.

8.2.2.3. More than one auto

Now let us consider the cases where two of these three properties are set to auto. If both the margins are set to

The applications that you create with Java and XML will rely on the services provided by your Java XML Parser (using DOM or SAX). The information itself might be stored in a variety of persistence engines (object databases, relational databases, file systems, dynamic websites, etc.). The information however that comes out of these persistence storage engines must be converted to XML (if they are not in XML already). Once this is done, you have to be concerned with the material covered in this document. This document outlines the most popular Java XML application categories that are possible in an environment where data is encoded with XML, where web access is ubiquitous and platform independence is a necessity.

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

This seems simple enough: the text in unordered lists should be 75% normal size. Ah, but what happens if you have unordered lists nested inside unordered lists? You get the results shown in Figure 11-21, that's what.

Figure 11-21

Figure 11-21. Help me

Wow! What happened? Simply put, each nested list cuts the font size by a quarter. Let's assume the document's base font-size is 12pt. Therefore, at the top level, the font's size will be three-quarters of that, or 9pt. All well and good, except the next