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<IMG HEIGHT=88 WIDTH=83 ALIGN=LEFT 
HSPACE=10 VSPACE=5 ALT="Ugly Guy!" SRC="ugly2.gif"> Specifyingimage dimensions lets the client browser block out the space 
and compose the page quicker. 
<BR CLEAR=LEFT>
You can stop text wrapping by including a CLEAR attribute in aline-break tag. 
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The simplest category of XML Java applications is the kind of Java application that stores information in XML documents (files). This is illustrated in Figure 1. By using XML to create your own markup languages (i.e. your own file formats for your information) in an open way, you don't have to use propietary and binary file formats. Using XML over proprietary binary file formats, allows your applications to have immense inter operability across platforms, applications and even programming languages. Since any kind of markup language can be defined using XML (you can even formalize it by creating a DTD for it) applications can store their information using their own markup languages. For example, address book information can be stored in an AddressBookML file. A few commercial programs currently available allow saving their application data to XML files, e.g., Framemaker can save its documents as XML files.

In order to create applications of this category, you might have to define a DTD for your information. Then you have to write classes to import and export information from your XML document(s) (validating using your application's DTD if you have one). You must also write the classes which create the user interface in your application. The user of your application can view and modify information using the GUI (graphical user interface), and they can save (and load) their information to (and from) an XML file (that might use your DTD); in other words, they can save (and load) their information to (and from) an ApplicationML file (where Application is the name of your application). Some examples are AddressBookML, MathML, SVGML, etc.

The classes that import and export information from your ApplicationML file must use the parser and SAX or DOM API in order to import the information. These classes can access this information by using one of the following strategies:

  1. Use DOM to directly manipulate the information stored in the document (which DOM turns into a tree of nodes). This document object is created by the DOM XML parser after it reads in the XML document. This option leads to messy and hard-to-understand code. Also, this works better for document-type data rather than just computer generated data (like data structures and objects used in your code).