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alignment of the inline boxes. Suppose that we change the boldface text to have a vertical alignment of middle. This would have the result shown in Figure 8-53.

Figure 8-53

Figure 8-53. Changing the vertical alignment of the larger text

Here, the middle of the boldfaced text's inline box has lined up with the middle of the inline boxes of the other text in the line. Because the inline boxes are all 12px tall, and their middles are all lined up, this means that the line box for this line is now only 12 pixels high, just like the others. However, it also means that the

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In a like manner, setting a negative value on the other sides willpull them beyond their normal limits:

<P STYLE="margin: -2em; font-weight: bold;">...

As Figure 7-19 makes abundantly clear, the paragraphhas spilled beyond the edges of the browser window and has not onlypulled up far enough to overlap the end of the previous paragraph,but has also pulled the following paragraph up to overlap its lastline.

this is not discussed here (see Chapter 8, "Visual Formatting", for more details).

7.4.6. Borders: Known Issues

Of course, there are a few problems with using borders. The most distressing is the fact that Navigator 4.x won't draw a border around the content area of a block-level element but instead inserts headers. Margins can also be applied to inline elements, although theeffects are a little different.

Let's say that you want to set top and bottom margins onboldfaced text. You declare:

B {margin-top: 25px; margin-bottom: 50px;}

This is allowed in the specification, but it will have absolutely noeffect on the line height, and since margins are effectivelytransparent, this will have no visual effect whatsoever -- as you tag, both of which are nonreplaced elements, and images,which are replaced elements.

WARNING

Note that none of this applies to table elements. CSS2 introduces new properties andbehaviors for handling tables and table content, and these newfeatures behave in ways fairly distinct from either block-level orinline formatting. See Section 10.1, "Changes from CSS1" for an overview.