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Figure 4-9

Figure 4-9. Inherited text-indenting

4.1.1.2. Aligning text

Even more basic thantext-indent is the propertytext-align, which affects how lines of text in anelement are aligned with respect to one another. There are four

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theory, as the user changes the width of a browser window, the margins and padding will expand or shrink dynamically -- but not every browser supports this sort of behavior. Still, using percentages for margin and padding may be the best way to set styles that will hold up in more than one media; for example, documents that will look good on a monitor as well as a printout.

It's also possible to mix percentages with length values. Thus, to set H1 elements to have top and bottom margins