Book HomeCascading Style Sheets: The Definitive GuideSearch this book Thursday 11th of February 2016 01:48:01 PM

Preface

The subject of this book is, as you might have guessed by the cover, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). There are two "levels" to CSS; these are referred to as CSS1 and CSS2. The difference between the two is that CSS2 is all of CSS1, plus a lot more. This book attempts to cover all of CSS1, and CSS positioning, which is a part of CSS2. The rest of CSS2 is excluded because, at the time of this writing, nobody had implemented most of it. Rather than cover a lot of theoretical territory, we chose to stick to what was currently usable.

If you are a web designer or document author interested in sophisticated page styling, improved accessibility, and saving time and effort, then this book is for you. All you really need before starting the book is a decent knowledge of HTML 4.0. The better you know HTML, of course, the better prepared you'll be. You will need to know very little else in order to follow this book. You can terminate list items with a </LI> tag but it's not required. Can you nest sub-lists within lists? Soitanly! Levels are differentiated by indent and bullet or number style Ordered lists let you specify TYPE and an ordinal VALUE for a list or any individual list item:  In-Line Images

Okay, now that you know how to format text on the page, let's include some in-line images.  The web supports images in GIF, JPEG or PNG formats. GIFs can have up to 256 colors.  JPEGs and PNGs can have millions (although clients' monitors may not display them

It is important to remember something about web standards and books: the former are continually evolving, while the latter are frozen in time (until the next edition comes out, anyway). In the case of HTML and CSS, there are a great many changes afoot even as these words are being written. The recent formalization of XHTML 1.0 as a full W3C Recommendation, for example, is a major milestone in the evolution of the World Wide Web. There are likely to be even more levels to CSS, further extending the ability to style documents; major web browsers are approaching full CSS1 support, and robust CSS2 implementations can be seen lurking on the horizon. This is an exciting time to be a designer, and learning CSS now will give you a leg up on the future.

0.1. Typographical Conventions

The following typographical conventions are used in this book:

Constant width

is used to indicate code examples, HTML tags and CSS elements.

Constant width italic

is used for replaceables that appear in text.

Italic

is used to introduce new terms and to indicate URLs, filenames, and pathnames.

TIP

indicates a note or tip relating to the nearby text.

WARNING

indicates a warning.



Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

6.1.3. Special Effects

Let's return to the happier realmof how things should work. Thanks to color andbackground-color, you can create some niceeffects. This example is shown in Figure 6-18:

P {color: black;}