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Preface

The subject of this book is, as you might have guessed by the cover, Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). There are two "levels" to CSS; these are referred to as CSS1 and CSS2. The difference between the two is that CSS2 is all of CSS1, plus a lot more. This book attempts to cover all of CSS1, and CSS positioning, which is a part of CSS2. The rest of CSS2 is excluded because, at the time of this writing, nobody had implemented most of it. Rather than cover a lot of theoretical territory, we chose to stick to what was currently usable.

If you are a web designer or document author interested in sophisticated page styling, improved accessibility, and saving time and effort, then this book is for you. All you really need before starting the book is a decent knowledge of HTML 4.0. The better you know HTML, of course, the better prepared you'll be. You will need to know very little else in order to follow this book.

It is important to remember something about web standards and books: the former are continually evolving, while the latter are frozen in time (until the next edition comes out, anyway). In the case of HTML and CSS, there are a great many changes afoot even as these words are being written. The recent formalization of XHTML 1.0 as a full W3C Recommendation, for example, is a major milestone in the evolution of the World Wide Web. There are likely to be even more levels to CSS, further extending the ability to style documents; major web browsers are approaching full CSS1 support, and robust CSS2 implementations can be seen lurking on the horizon. This is an exciting time to be a designer, and learning CSS now will give you a leg up on the future.

0.1. Typographical Conventions

The following typographical conventions are used in this book:

Constant width
laoreet dolore magna aliquam erat volutpat.</P>
Figure 9-22

Figure 9-22. Another approach to defining a "change bar"

Remember when we mentioned static-position much earlier in the chapter? Here's one example of how it works and how it can be very useful.

Another important point is that when an element is positioned, it establishes a containing block for its descendant elements. For example, we could absolutely position an element and then absolutely position one of its children, as shown in Figure 9-23.

is used to indicate code examples, HTML tags and CSS elements.

Constant width italic

is used for replaceables that appear in text.

Italic

is used to introduce new terms and to indicate URLs, filenames, and pathnames.

TIP

indicates a note or tip relating to the nearby text.

WARNING

indicates a warning.



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There are many uses for color, of course, the most basic of which is to replace the BODY attributes TEXT, LINK , ALINK , and VLINK. In conjunction with the anchor pseudo-classes, color can replace these BODY attributes outright. The first line in the following example can be rewritten with the subsequent CSS, and either will have the result depicted in Figure 6-3:

85px . Thus the top inner edge of the floated element should be at pixel position 85.

A similar line of reasoning explains how the left inner edge of the floated element can be placed to the left of the left inner edge of its parent. This ability can be used for interesting effects like hanging floated images, but only if the browser honors negative margins on floated elements. If it does, the result will be something like that shown in Figure 7-71.

DIV. The fact that it overlaps the paragraphdoesn't matter, at least not technically.

Now let's consider an example where the margins of a list item,an unordered list, and a heading are all collapsed. In this case, theunordered list and heading will be set to have negative margins:

The larger of the two negative margins (-18px ) isadded to the largest positive margin (20px ),yielding (20px-18px = 2px ). I will take a break from my normal pragmatic approach to getting you (the programmer) started with using XML and Java and just talk about the high level (design level) benefits of this wonderful combination. A good design is important to a good implementation for any system.

XML is structured

When you create your data using an XML editor (that you can write), you can not only input the content of your data, but also define the structural relationships that exist inside your data. By allowing you to define your own tags and create the proper structural relationships in your information (with a DTD), you can use any XML parser to check the validity and integrity of the data stored in your XML documents. This makes it very easy to validate the structure and content of your information when you use XML. Without XML, you could also provide this validation feature at the expense of developing the code to this yourself. XML is a great time saver because most of the features that are available in XML are used by most programmers when working on most projects.

By using XML and Java, you can quickly create and use information that is properly structured and valid. By using (or creating) DTDs and storing your information in XML documents, you have a cross-platform and language independent data validation mechanism (for free) in all your projects!

You might use XML to define file formats to store information that is generated and used by your applications. This is another use of the structured nature of XML. The only limitation is that binary information can't be embedded in the body of XML documents. For example, if you wrote a word processor in Java, you might choose to save your word processor documents to an XML (actually your ApplicationML) file. If you use a DTD then your word processor would also get input file format validation as a feature for free. There are many other advantages to using XML and a file storage format for your applications which will be illustrated later in the chapter.