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Appendix B. HTML 2.0 Style Sheet

The style sheet provided in this chapter was excerpted from the CSS1 specification and is included here to give authors an idea of how legacy browser behavior in handling HTML can be reproduced, or at least approximated, using CSS1 rules. A thorough understanding of this style sheet is a good first step to understanding how CSS1 operates. The simpler HTML 2.0 style sheet is reproduced here in order to minimize complexity and possible confusion. A suggested style sheet for HTML 3.2 is also available on the W3C web site, as part of the CSS2 specification.

This HTML 2.0 style sheet was written by Todd Fahrner, in accordance with the suggested rendering in the HTML 2.0 specification:

 BODY {
margin: 1em;
font-family: serif;
line-height: 1.1;
background: white;
color: black;
}
H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6, P, UL, OL, DIR, MENU, DIV,
DT, DD, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE, PRE, BR, HR { display: block }
B, STRONG, I, EM, CITE, VAR, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP,
IMG, SPAN { display: inline }
LI { display: list-item }
H1, H2, H3, H4 { margin-top: 1em; margin-bottom: 1em }
H5, H6 { margin-top: 1em }
H1 { text-align: center }
H1, H2, H4, H6 { font-weight: bold }
H3, H5 { font-style: italic }
H1 { font-size: xx-large }
H2 { font-size: x-large }
background-color is not inherited. Its defaultvalue istransparent,which makes sense; if an element doesn't have a defined color,then its background should be transparent so that the background ofits ancestor elements will be visible. Imagine for a moment that thedefault value were something else, such as silver.Then you would always see something along the lines of Figure 6-16. This could be quite a problem, if
H3 { font-size: large }
B, STRONG { font-weight: bolder } /* relative to the parent */
I, CITE, EM, VAR, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE { font-style: italic }
PRE, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP { font-family: monospace }
PRE { white-space: pre }
ADDRESS { margin-left: 3em }
BLOCKQUOTE { margin-left: 3em; margin-right: 3em }
UL, DIR { list-style: disc }
OL { list-style: decimal }
MENU { margin: 0 }      /* tight formatting */
LI { margin-left: 3em }
DT { margin-bottom: 0 }
DD { margin-top: 0; margin-left: 3em }
HR { border-top: solid }   /* 'border-bottom' could also have been used */
A:link { color: blue }    /* unvisited link */
A:visited { color: red }   /* visited links */
A:active { color: lime }   /* active links */
/* setting the anchor border around IMG elements
requires contextual selectors */
A:link IMG { border: 2px solid blue }
A:visited IMG { border: 2px solid red }
A:active IMG { border: 2px solid lime }


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line-heights 1.5 time their font-size... and that includes <BIG>this big element right here</BIG>. By using a scaling factor, line-heights scale to match the font-size of any element.</P>
Figure 8-64

Figure 8-64. Using a scaling factor for line-height

In this example, the line-height for the SMALL element turns out to be 12px , and for the BIG element, it's 36px . These may seem excessive, but they're in keeping with the overall page design. Of course, if you don't want your BIG text to generate too