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Appendix B. HTML 2.0 Style Sheet

The style sheet provided in this chapter was excerpted from the CSS1 specification and is included here to give authors an idea of how legacy browser behavior in handling HTML can be reproduced, or at least approximated, using CSS1 rules. A thorough understanding of this style sheet is a good first step to understanding how CSS1 operates. The simpler HTML 2.0 style sheet is reproduced here in order to minimize complexity and possible confusion. A suggested style sheet for HTML 3.2 is also available on the W3C web site, as part of the CSS2 specification.

This HTML 2.0 style sheet was written by Todd Fahrner, in accordance with the suggested rendering in the HTML 2.0 specification:

 BODY {
margin: 1em;
font-family: serif;
line-height: 1.1;
background: white;
color: black;
}
H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6, P, UL, OL, DIR, MENU, DIV,
DT, DD, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE, PRE, BR, HR { display: block }

Depending on which of the three options you use to access information using your Java classes, this information must at some point be saved back to a file (probably to the one from which it was read). When the user of your application invokes a File->Save action, the information in the application must be written out to an ApplicationML file. Now this information is stored in memory, either as a (DOM) tree of nodes, or in your own proprietary object model. Also note that most DOM XML parsers can generate XML code from DOM document objects (but its quite trivial to turn a tree of nodes into XML by writing the code to do it yourself). There are 2 basic ways to get this information back into an ApplicationML file:

B, STRONG, I, EM, CITE, VAR, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP, IMG, SPAN { display: inline } LI { display: list-item } H1, H2, H3, H4 { margin-top: 1em; margin-bottom: 1em } H5, H6 { margin-top: 1em } H1 { text-align: center } H1, H2, H4, H6 { font-weight: bold } H3, H5 { font-style: italic } H1 { font-size: xx-large } H2 { font-size: x-large } H3 { font-size: large } B, STRONG { font-weight: bolder } /* relative to the parent */ I, CITE, EM, VAR, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE { font-style: italic } PRE, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP { font-family: monospace } PRE { white-space: pre } ADDRESS { margin-left: 3em } BLOCKQUOTE { margin-left: 3em; margin-right: 3em } UL, DIR { list-style: disc } OL { list-style: decimal } MENU { margin: 0 } /* tight formatting */ LI { margin-left: 3em } DT { margin-bottom: 0 } DD { margin-top: 0; margin-left: 3em } HR { border-top: solid } /* 'border-bottom' could also have been used */ A:link { color: blue } /* unvisited link */ A:visited { color: red } /* visited links */ A:active { color: lime } /* active links */ /* setting the anchor border around IMG elements requires contextual selectors */ A:link IMG { border: 2px solid blue } A:visited IMG { border: 2px solid red } A:active IMG { border: 2px solid lime }



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gray with just a hint of blue.

The equivalents for the various rainbow primaries, plus a few others, are presented in Table 3-1.

Table 3-1. Numeric RGB Equivalents for Common Colors

It is also possible, at least in theory, to use fractional values. For example, you might want a color to be exactly 25.5% red, 40% green, and 98.6% blue. Not a problem:

In an unordered list, these will be little symbols, but in an ordered list, the bullet could be a letter or number.

7.7.1. Types of Lists

This part will probably seem very familiar to those of you who have been fiddling with lists in HTML. In order to change the type of counter or bullet used for a list's items, you would use the list-style-type.

XML enables interoperability

All of the advantages of XML outlined so far all make interoperability possible. This is one of the most important requirements for XML, to enable disparate systems to be able to share information easily.

By taking the lowest common denominator approach, by being web enabled, protocol independent, network independent, platform independent and extensible, XML makes it possible for new systems and old systems (that are all different) to communicate with each other. Encoding information in plain text with tags is better than using propietary and platform dependent binary formats.

Vision

addition to the fact that the text characters "lean," theserifs may be altered in an italic face. Oblique text, on the otherhand, is simply a slanted version of the normal, upright text. Fontfaces with labels like Italic, Cursive,and Kursivare usually mapped to the italic keyword, whileoblique can be assigned faces with labels such asOblique,