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Appendix B. HTML 2.0 Style Sheet

The style sheet provided in this chapter was excerpted from the CSS1 specification and is included here to give authors an idea of how legacy browser behavior in handling HTML can be reproduced, or at least approximated, using CSS1 rules. A thorough understanding of this style sheet is a good first step to understanding how CSS1 operates. The simpler HTML 2.0 style sheet is reproduced here in order to minimize complexity and possible confusion. A suggested style sheet for HTML 3.2 is also available on the W3C web site, as part of the CSS2 specification.

This HTML 2.0 style sheet was written by Todd Fahrner, in accordance with the suggested rendering in the HTML 2.0 specification:

 BODY {
margin: 1em;
font-family: serif;
line-height: 1.1;
background: white;
color: black;
}
H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6, P, UL, OL, DIR, MENU, DIV,
DT, DD, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE, PRE, BR, HR { display: block }
B, STRONG, I, EM, CITE, VAR, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP,
IMG, SPAN { display: inline }
LI { display: list-item }
H1, H2, H3, H4 { margin-top: 1em; margin-bottom: 1em }
H5, H6 { margin-top: 1em }
H1 { text-align: center }
H1, H2, H4, H6 { font-weight: bold }
H3, H5 { font-style: italic }
H1 { font-size: xx-large }
H2 { font-size: x-large }
H3 { font-size: large }
B, STRONG { font-weight: bolder } /* relative to the parent */
I, CITE, EM, VAR, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE { font-style: italic }
PRE, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP { font-family: monospace }
PRE { white-space: pre }
ADDRESS { margin-left: 3em }
BLOCKQUOTE { margin-left: 3em; margin-right: 3em }
UL, DIR { list-style: disc }
OL { list-style: decimal }
MENU { margin: 0 }      /* tight formatting */
LI { margin-left: 3em }
DT { margin-bottom: 0 }
DD { margin-top: 0; margin-left: 3em }


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Introduction

The applications that you create with Java and XML will rely on the services provided by your Java XML Parser (using DOM or SAX). The information itself might be stored in a variety of persistence engines (object databases, relational databases, file systems, dynamic websites, etc.). The information however that comes out of these persistence storage engines must be converted to XML (if they are not in XML already). Once this is done, you have to be concerned with the material covered in this document. This document outlines the most popular Java XML application categories that are possible in an environment where data is encoded with XML, where web access is ubiquitous and platform independence is a necessity.

Java Application Layer

All of the code that you write (in your Java classes) might be considered the Java application layer. Other layers are the XML Parser layer, the XML source (that supplies the XML data that is necessary), and the persistence engine (where the data is actually stored and retrieved by the source).

Your code (in the Java application layer) has to make use of the DOM or SAX API and the XML parser in order to access the information in XML documents (that come from your source). The source might be responsible for pulling data from different persistence engines (relational or object databases) and even the web (dynamically generated websites that supply only XML data).

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TIP

This case study ends up using quite a few advanced styles and, assuch, may be beyond the capabilities of most older user agents.It's still very instructive, even on a theoretical level, andit should work in a browser that fully and correctly supports CSS1.Just be prepared for one or more errors if you try this in a web