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Appendix B. HTML 2.0 Style Sheet

The style sheet provided in this chapter was excerpted from the CSS1 specification and is included here to give authors an idea of how legacy browser behavior in handling HTML can be reproduced, or at least approximated, using CSS1 rules. A thorough understanding of this style sheet is a good first step to understanding how CSS1 operates. The simpler HTML 2.0 style sheet is reproduced here in order to minimize complexity and possible confusion. A suggested style sheet for HTML 3.2 is also available on the W3C web site, as part of the CSS2 specification.

This HTML 2.0 style sheet was written by Todd Fahrner, in accordance with the suggested rendering in the HTML 2.0 specification:

 BODY {
margin: 1em;
font-family: serif;
line-height: 1.1;
background: white;
color: black;
}
H1, H2, H3, H4, H5, H6, P, UL, OL, DIR, MENU, DIV,
DT, DD, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE, PRE, BR, HR { display: block }
B, STRONG, I, EM, CITE, VAR, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP,
IMG, SPAN { display: inline }
LI { display: list-item }
H1, H2, H3, H4 { margin-top: 1em; margin-bottom: 1em }

On the other hand, it might be okay to go beyond the bottom and rightedges, but not the top or left. Figure 9-13 showsthe results of these styles (and remember, the dashed lines are onlyfor illustrative purposes):

DIV#sidebar {position: absolute; top: 0; left: 0; width: 5em; height: 7em;overflow: hidden; overflow-clip: rect(0, 6em, 9em, 0);}
Figure 9-13

Figure 9-13. Expanding the clipping region

This extends the area in which content can be seen. However, itdoesn't change the flow of the content, so the only visual H5, H6 { margin-top: 1em } H1 { text-align: center } H1, H2, H4, H6 { font-weight: bold } H3, H5 { font-style: italic } H1 { font-size: xx-large } H2 { font-size: x-large } H3 { font-size: large } B, STRONG { font-weight: bolder } /* relative to the parent */ I, CITE, EM, VAR, ADDRESS, BLOCKQUOTE { font-style: italic } PRE, TT, CODE, KBD, SAMP { font-family: monospace } PRE { white-space: pre } ADDRESS { margin-left: 3em } BLOCKQUOTE { margin-left: 3em; margin-right: 3em } UL, DIR { list-style: disc } OL { list-style: decimal } MENU { margin: 0 } /* tight formatting */ LI { margin-left: 3em } DT { margin-bottom: 0 } DD { margin-top: 0; margin-left: 3em } HR { border-top: solid } /* 'border-bottom' could also have been used */ A:link { color: blue } /* unvisited link */ A:visited { color: red } /* visited links */ A:active { color: lime } /* active links */ /* setting the anchor border around IMG elements requires contextual selectors */ A:link IMG { border: 2px solid blue } A:visited IMG { border: 2px solid red } A:active IMG { border: 2px solid lime }



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containing block are treated as auto.

In addition, even though they don't explicitly say so, theexamples in this section (and the next few sections) are all basedaround absolute positioning. Since absolute positioning is thesimplest scheme in which to demonstrate how top,right, bottom, andleft work, we'll stick to that for now.

parent element's text shows through the positioned element. Theonly way to avoid this is to set a background for the positionedelement.

Note that the boldface element in this case is positioned in relationto its parent element's content box, which defines itscontaining block. Without the relative positioning of the parentelement, the containing block would be another element. Consider acase where the element being positioned is a child of theBODY element, e.g., a paragraph or heading

XML documents may be stored in files or databases. When stored in files, XML documents are simply plain text files with tags (and possibly DTDs). It is very easy to save your XML documents to a text file and pass the text file around to other machines, platforms and programs (as long as they can understand the data). In the worst case scenario, XML documents (files) can be viewed in a text editor on just about any platform.

XML documents are also naturally committed to a database (relational or object) or any other kind of XML document store. There are commercial products available which allow you to save XML documents to an XML storage layer (which is not a database per se), like Datachannel's XStore and ODI's eXcelon. These XML store solutions are quite expensive ($10,000 to $20,000 range).

XML documents are also quite naturally retrieved from a persistence layer (databases, file systems, XML stores). This lends XML to be used in real world applications where the information being used by different parts of a system is the most important thing.

XML is platform independent, textual information