This appendix lists all CSS1 properties, plus the CSS1 pseudo-elements and pseudo-classes. The values to the right of a property name show the browser compatibility information for that property. They will look something like this:

The first value in each pair is for the Windows version; the second value is for the Macintosh version. (Sorry, Macintosh folks, but we are in the minority.) For instance, IE4 Y/N means that the property is supported in IE4 for Windows, but not IE4 for Macintosh. The possible support values are: Friday 28th of April 2017 06:20:42 AM

by Eric A. Meyer
ISBN 1-56592-622-6
First edition, published May 2000.
(See the catalog page for this book.)

Search the text of Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide.

Table of Contents

Copyright Page
Preface
Chapter 1: HTML and CSS
Chapter 2: Selectors and Structure
Chapter 3: Units and Values
Chapter 4: Text Properties
Chapter 5: Fonts
Chapter 6: Colors and Backgrounds
Chapter 7: Boxes and Borders
Chapter 8: Visual Formatting
Chapter 9: Positioning
Chapter 10: CSS2: A Look Ahead
Chapter 11: CSS in Action
Appendix A: CSS Resources
Appendix B: HTML 2.0 Style Sheet
Appendix C: CSS1 Properties
Appendix D: CSS Support Chart
Index
Colophon
Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

containing block.

As wonderful as all of this is, there arises a serious question. Suppose you have a positioned element that you don't want to be any smaller than a certain size? Consider the following styles:

top: 10%; bottom: 20%; left: 50%; right: 10%;

Thus the height is 70%, and the width 40% of the containing block's height and width. That's fine as far as it goes -- but what happens if the containing block is only 50 pixelslarge image in the background of a document, and then keep it fromrepeating. Let's add to that and actually change theimage's position in the background.

background-position

WARNING

Percentage values refer to a point on both the element and the originimage (see explanation in Section 6.2.3.2, "Percentage values" later in this chapter).

padding-top, padding-right, padding-bottom, padding-left

Values

<length> | <percentage>

Initial value
which illustrates the differences very clearly.

Figure 5-24

Figure 5-24. Italic and oblique text in detail

Basically, italic text is in some way its own font, with smallchanges made to the structure of each letter to account for thealtered appearance. This is especially true of serif fonts, where inaddition to the fact that the text characters "lean," theserifs may be altered in an italic face. Oblique text, on the otherhand, is simply a slanted version of the normal, upright text. Fontfaces with labels like Italic, In the second one, however, the place where the boldface elementwould have appeared is simply closed up, and the positioned textoverlaps the some of the content. There is no way to avoid this,short of positioning the boldfaced text outside of the paragraph (byusing a negative value for right) or by specifyinga padding for the paragraph that is wide enough to accommodate thepositioned element. Also, since it has a transparent background, theparent element's text shows through the positioned element. Theonly way to avoid this is to set a background for the positionedelement.