behaviors for handling tables and table content, and these new features behave in ways fairly distinct from either block-level or inline formatting. See Section 10.1, "Changes from CSS1" for an overview.

8.4.1. Line Layout

First, we need to understand how inline content is laid out. It isn't as simple and straightforward as Sunday 14th of February 2016 05:48:37 PM

by Eric A. Meyer
ISBN 1-56592-622-6
First edition, published May 2000.
(See the
catalog page for this book.)

Search the text of Cascading Style Sheets: The Definitive Guide.

Table of Contents

Copyright Page
Preface
Chapter 1: HTML and CSS
Chapter 2: Selectors and Structure
Chapter 3: Units and Values
Chapter 4: Text Properties
Chapter 5: Fonts
Chapter 6: Colors and Backgrounds
Chapter 7: Boxes and Borders
Chapter 8: Visual Formatting
Chapter 9: Positioning
Chapter 10: CSS2: A Look Ahead
Chapter 11: CSS in Action
Appendix A: CSS Resources
Appendix B: HTML 2.0 Style Sheet
Appendix C: CSS1 Properties
Appendix D: CSS Support Chart
Index
Colophon
Library Navigation Links

Copyright © 2002 O'Reilly & Associates. All rights reserved.

beyond the right edge of the browser window. 

The preferred way to control text alignment is by including an ALIGN attribute in a block-level tag such as a paragraph <P ALIGN="left">, headline, e.g., <H2 ALIGN="center"> or page division <DIV ALIGN="right">.  Each of these should terminate with a corresponding termination tag </P>, </H2> or </DIV> as appropriate. 

The block-level <CENTER> tag is still a commonly-used

6.2.2. Repeats with Direction

Thus far, all we've ever been able to do in document design is repeat background images in both the horizontal and vertical directions. If we wanted some kind of without a declared width, whose overall width (including margins) is therefore dependent on the width of the parent element.

Figure 7-11

Figure 7-11. Percentage margins and changing environments

As you can imagine, this leads to the possibility of "fluid" pages, where the margins and padding of elements enlarge or reduce to match the actual size of the display canvas. In theory, as the user changes the width of a browser window, the margins and padding will expand or shrink dynamically -- but not